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I have a matrix (1051*1051) that has 0zeros along its diagonal and values greater than 0zero everywhere else. The goal is to conditionally reassign some values in the matrix. For example, the criteria I would like to implement is this: If any element is greater than, say, 400, then that row/column element will be assigned a 0zero value.

This is how my code is setup as of now:

dl <- 400       # condition

for( i in 1:dim(DIST)[1] ) {
    for( j in 1:dim(DIST)[1] ) {
        if( DIST[i,j] > dl ) {
             DIS[i,j] <- 0
        }
    }
}

DIST is the original matrix (1051*1051).

DIS is the copy of DIST and to be edited.

My question: Is there any other way to do this? A faster way?

I have read that loops in R should be avoided. If anyone has a more efficient way please share.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Can you clarify if you want the entire row and column setting to 0 for elements that are greater than the condition? Several of us are confused? –  Gavin Simpson Jul 27 '11 at 21:09
    
Just the element in DIS[i,j]==0 iff DIS[i,j]>dl –  wisfool Jul 27 '11 at 23:16
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Just use [] assignment:

DIST[DIST>400] <- 0

See ?'[' for how this works. The key is that DIST>400 produces a logical vector of length length(DIST) (the number of elements in DIST), consisting of TRUE if the element is >400 and FALSE otherwise. That vector is then used to subset the matrix, and only the selected elements get assigned to.

share|improve this answer
    
You nailed the question. This was what I was looking for. Sorry about the confusion on row/column. I do not want the entire row/column to 0zero. Just the element that violates the condition. –  wisfool Jul 27 '11 at 23:20
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Try

DIS[DIST > d1] <- 0

Full example:

n <- 10
d1 <- 400
DIST <- matrix(as.integer(runif(n^2)*1e4), n, n)
DIS <- DIST
DIS[DIST > d1] <- 0
share|improve this answer
    
there you go... I'm wondering: should I delete my answer as it is the same but you were faster or is that bad habits? –  cbeleites Jul 27 '11 at 20:47
    
Cloning the vector to DIS before comparison and assignment is unnecessary and computationally (memory and speed) inefficient. The assignment happens after the logical comparison, so DIST[DIST>400] <- 0 works fine. –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 27 '11 at 20:55
    
@cbeleites: Given that your answer is a two-liner and exactly reproduces djhurio's more detailed example, I'd go ahead and delete it. I gave you a +1 so you can get a Disciplined badge for deleting ;-). –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 27 '11 at 20:56
    
gsk, I understood the question so that a copy should be done [deleting: :-) turns out I can only vote that my answer should be deleted. ] –  cbeleites Jul 27 '11 at 21:03
    
@cbeleites: Good point about the question asking for it. He also asked for faster though, so I went with modification. But it does explain why DIS showed up in both your answers. :-) –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 27 '11 at 21:14
show 2 more comments

Here is an example of doing this treating the matrix as a vector and using the row() and col() functions to return the relevant rows and columns of the entries that are greater than a condition.

First, create some dummy data:

set.seed(1)
m <- matrix(runif(25), ncol = 5)
diag(m) <- 0

Next we use row() and col() to return a matrix with the row or col index for each entry in the matrix.

mr <- row(m)
mc <- col(m)

mr looks like this, for example:

> mr
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    1    1    1    1
[2,]    2    2    2    2    2
[3,]    3    3    3    3    3
[4,]    4    4    4    4    4
[5,]    5    5    5    5    5

Now we set out condition value, and select those cells of m that exceed the condition:

cond <- 0.95
want <- which(m > cond)

Having these cells that exceed the condition, we extract the unique row and column indexes for these cells

rwant <- unique(mr[want])
cwant <- unique(mc[want])

these are the rows and columns you want setting to 0.

Here we do this setting to zero, first copying m in m2 for comparison:

m2 <- m
m2[rwant, ] <- 0
m2[, cwant] <- 0

Here are the two matrices:

> m
          [,1]       [,2]      [,3]      [,4]      [,5]
[1,] 0.0000000 0.89838968 0.2059746 0.4976992 0.9347052
[2,] 0.3721239 0.00000000 0.1765568 0.7176185 0.2121425
[3,] 0.5728534 0.66079779 0.0000000 0.9919061 0.6516738
[4,] 0.9082078 0.62911404 0.3841037 0.0000000 0.1255551
[5,] 0.2016819 0.06178627 0.7698414 0.7774452 0.0000000
> m2
          [,1]       [,2]      [,3] [,4]      [,5]
[1,] 0.0000000 0.89838968 0.2059746    0 0.9347052
[2,] 0.3721239 0.00000000 0.1765568    0 0.2121425
[3,] 0.0000000 0.00000000 0.0000000    0 0.0000000
[4,] 0.9082078 0.62911404 0.3841037    0 0.1255551
[5,] 0.2016819 0.06178627 0.7698414    0 0.0000000
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, perhaps I misunderstood what row/column element meant. I thought you meant the entire row or column should be set to zero. –  Gavin Simpson Jul 27 '11 at 20:51
    
I just deleted my post because he did ask for entire row/column set to zero and I'd mis-read. Temporary undeleted while waiting for his answer as to what he really wanted. –  Ari B. Friedman Jul 27 '11 at 20:59
    
That's what I understood as well (entire column to be set to 0). –  Roman Luštrik Jul 27 '11 at 21:14
    
I think this is the source of the confusion: "... then that row/column element will be assigned a 0zero value." What I meant by "row/column element" was if DIS[i,j] violates the condition, than DIS[i,j] <- 0, for any i,j within dim(DIS) –  wisfool Jul 27 '11 at 23:27
    
@Gavin Simpson I appreciate your answer. I learned new ways to manipulate in R with row(), which(), unique(). I still consider myself a 'newbie' so these tools help a lot. –  wisfool Jul 27 '11 at 23:31
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