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In C++ can I reset the function pointer for an operator?

In particular I want to set the member function operator[] to use (or not use) bounds checking. I tried this with no luck:

Is this even possible? If so, Can anyone correct the syntax?

in MyArrayClass.h:

class MyArrayClass {
public:
    bool CheckArrayBounds;
    float BoundsCheck(int i) {
        if (i<_size) 
            return _data[i]; 
        return TCpx(_INVALID); 
    }
    float NoBoundsCheck(int i) {
        return _data[i]; 
    }
    void UseBoundsCheck(bool State) {
        if (State) {
            float (operator[]) = &MyArrayClass::BoundsCheck;
        } else {
            float (operator[]) = &MyArrayClass::NoBoundsCheck;
        }
        CheckArrayBounds = State;
    }
    float operator[](int i) { return _data[i]; };
};
share|improve this question
1  
Instead of using a conditional you can do it like how std::vector does it by having an operator[]() and a function at() that both do the same thing. Except that operator[]() does no bounds-checking and at() does bounds-checking. – In silico Jul 27 '11 at 21:33
1  
Cannot you use a STL container like std::vector instead ? Are you trying to achieve some feature that is not available in STL containers ? – Gob00st Jul 27 '11 at 21:35
    
Operators are usually defined inline (as here) and as such usually not really "called" but rather substituted in place where they are used. That happens at compile time, so its definition cannot possibly be changed at runtime. However, of course you can change the behaviour of the operator[] to do bounds checking or not depending on some variable. The only way, one could do something like changing function pointers that comes to my mind would be via shared libraries. – Tilman Vogel Jul 27 '11 at 21:40
    
Ah, and if the UseBoundsCheck() purpose is to enable/disable that for debug vs. release builds, consider using assert() or Q_ASSERT() or similar. – Tilman Vogel Jul 27 '11 at 21:43

This is not possible. Semantically speaking, member functions are not function pointers (although they may be implemented that way under the hood).

You could perform the check on State inside operator[] (), or use a proxy object.

share|improve this answer

You cannot change operator for particular object instance in runtime because member functions are stored separately from object attributes and are the same for all object instances. And they are stored in write-protected memory segment. Or could even be inlined by the compiler.

Still you can check for state inside of the operator[] implementation.

Also you can create attribute at and replace operator.

class MyArrayClass {
public:
    float (MyArrayClass::*at)(int i);
    float BoundsCheck(int i);
    float NoBoundsCheck(int i); {
    void UseBoundsCheck(bool State) {
        at = (State)? &MyArrayClass::BoundsCheck : &MyArrayClass::NoBoundsCheck;
    }
};

Usage:

MyArrayClass a;
a.at( 1 );
share|improve this answer

No.

Methods (and operators which are just syntactic sugar for methods/functions) are defined at compile time not run time.

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C++ isn't the right kind of language for this, unfortunately. You need a much more powerful type system.

Note that even if you could, you'd probably slow your program down: a integer comparison is much more expensive that a function call through a pointer. Especially since your CPU can branch predict: it'll start running code as if it passed the check, and if it ends up failing it can ditch whatever it was doing.

But note your compiler is smart. For example, if we have this:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

void process(std::vector<int>& data)
{
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < data.size(); ++i)
    {
        int v = data.at(i);
        std::cout << v << std::endl;
    }
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        std::vector<int> data;
        std::generate_n(std::back_inserter(data), std::rand() + 1, std::rand);

        process(data);
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        std::cerr << "nope.avi" << std::endl;
    }
}

And if we compile with g++ -O3, there is no bounds checking code. Indeed, the compiler has deduced that the check inside at() will never pass (which then throws), so it stripped away that code. So you can leave the bounds checking in and your compiler can still strip it away. Note, though, that any more complex cases may make it too hard for the compiler to prove, so you'll pay for it.

These are the kind of optimizations you could guarantee with a more expressive type system, but the compiler can do them anyway. I don't know about MSVC; it tends not to be as smart, but you can check.

Your best bet is to go the std::vector<> route: provide an unchecked operator[] and a checked at(). Let the user of your class decide if they need checks or not.

share|improve this answer

Functions and member functions are effectively constant an immutable, and it is not possible to change them at runtime. However, there's a kind of half-way house to what you are trying to do, and you were almost there in your posted code.

What you can do is define a pointer to a member function, and then alter the pointer value at runtime depending on whether you want bounds checking active or not.

class MyArrayClass {
public:
    typedef float (MyArrayClass::*AccessFn)(int i);
    AccessFn Access;
    bool CheckArrayBounds;

    float BoundsCheck(int i) {
        if (i<_size)
            return _data[i];
        return TCpx(_INVALID);
    }
    float NoBoundsCheck(int i) {
        return _data[i];
    }

    MyArrayClass() { UseBoundsCheck(false); }

    void UseBoundsCheck(bool State) {
        if (State) {
            Access = &MyArrayClass::BoundsCheck;
        } else {
            Access = &MyArrayClass::NoBoundsCheck;
        }
        CheckArrayBounds = State;
    }
    float operator[](int i) { return (this->*Access)(i); }
};

This is the closest way of doing what you've requested that I can think of.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. I originally tried your method without success because I had the syntax for the operator[] wrong: float operator[](int i) { return Access(i); }; // <- BAD SYNTAX I was hoping to avoid the indirection required for the Access() function since the operator[] is called a LOT in loops and this is for an embedded system not guaranteed to support STL. So, I added a #define in the code to build it either way. Again- Thanks for your time in considering this issue. – Michael Fitzpatrick Aug 2 '11 at 16:42

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