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Hi looking at the repository pattern which commonly seems to be implemented something like:

public class GenericRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    // other business

    public virtual TEntity GetByID(object id)
    {
        return db.Set().Find(id);
    }

    public virtual void Insert(TEntity entity)
    {
        db.Set().Add(entity);
    }

    public virtual void Delete(object id)
    {
        TEntity entityToDelete = db.Set().Find(id);
        Delete(entityToDelete);
    }

    public virtual void Update(TEntity entityToUpdate)
    {
        db.Set().Attach(entityToUpdate);
        context.Entry(entityToUpdate).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }
}

So for every type you want to work with (ie update) you need to instantiate a repository.

So if I had two types I wanted to save Cars and Trucks I would need to go:

var carRepository = new GernericRepository<Car>();
carRepository.Update(myCar);

var truckRepository = new GernericRepository<Truck>();
carRepository.Update(myTruck);

So then you have seperate repositories for each type. To make sure you save everything at once you need the unitOfWork to ensure they all use the same context and save at one time.

Surely wouldn't it be better to have something like:

public class GenericRepository
{
    // other business

    public virtual TEntity GetByID<TEntity>(object id) where TEntity : class
    {
        return db.Set<TEntity>().Find(id);
    }

    public virtual void Insert<TEntity>(TEntity entity) where TEntity : class
    {
        db.Set<TEntity>().Add(entity);
    }

    public virtual void Delete<TEntity>(object id) where TEntity : class
    {
        TEntity entityToDelete = db.Set<TEntity>().Find(id);
        Delete(entityToDelete);
    }

    public virtual void Update<TEntity>(TEntity entityToUpdate) where TEntity : class
    {
        db.Set<TEntity>().Attach(entityToUpdate);
        context.Entry(entityToUpdate).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }
}

This means the repository only needs to be instantiated once and therefore is truely generic?

So you could update your cars and trucks like this:

var repository = new GernericRepository<Car>();
repository.Update<Car>(myCar);
rRepository.Update<Truck>(myTruck);

Surely this is a better method? Am I missing something? It automatically has only one context too.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The repository pattern does not decouple the data access from the data store, that is what the ETL tool such as NHibernate or the Enity Framework does for. The repository pattern provides reusable methods for extracting data.

I have previously used a so called "Generic" repository as you have described and thought it was great. It isn't until you realise that you have just put another layer on top of NHibernate or the Entity Framework you realise it's all gone Pete Tong.

Ideally what you want are interfaces that describe ways of getting data out of your data store and should not leak what data access you are using. For example:

public interface IEmployee interface
{
    IEmployee GetEmployeeById(Guid employeeId);

    IEmployee GetEmployeeByEmployeeNumber(string employeeNumber);

    IEnumerable<IEmployee> GetAllEmployeesWithSurname(string surname);

    IEnumerable<IEmployee> GetAllEmployeesWithStartDateBetween(DateTime beginDateTime, DateTime endDateTime);
}

This gives you a contract to code to, there is no knowledge of your persistence layer and the queries used to retrieve the data can be unit tested in isolation. The interface could inherit from a base interface that provides common CRUD methods but you would be assuming that all your repositories would need CRUD.

If you go down the road of a Generic Repository you will end up with duplication in your queries and you will find it much harder to unit test the code that uses the repository as you will have to test the queries as well.

share|improve this answer
    
yes - all about the interfaces, and you can apply generic interfaces too, ie IRepository<Employee>. – CRice Jul 28 '11 at 0:45
3  
@Bronumski: the repository pattern does decouple the data store (the physical location of the data) from the data access (methods used to interact with that data), by definition. EF and NHibernate provide repository implementations that tightly couple your application to their technology, so you create your own repository wrapper which decouples the use of any particular technology from your application. More complex scenarios fork the repository idea into a set of service layers, allowing the repository concept to focus on building queries instead of returning specific data sets. – Nick Larsen Jul 28 '11 at 1:27
    
@Nick, yes but in most applications tightly coupling to EF, NHibernate or some other data store is acceptable. I have yet to find a project where I either needed to change persistence technologies or where doing so would not affect the domain drastically anyway. (Like switching from a relational to a document db would fundamentally alter the way you use persistence.) Having a generic repository does not offset the penalties of hacking around SELECT N+1s or managing child collections. – Ryan Jul 28 '11 at 2:15
    
@Ryan, of course it is acceptable in smaller projects, but it happens all the time as data sets grow. Even Stack Overflow is moving off of linq 2 sql, and storing a fair amount on a redis box. Managing n+1's and child collections is the implementations concern, not the repository interface. – Nick Larsen Jul 28 '11 at 11:57

Generics by itself does not make an implementation of the repository pattern. We've all seen the generic base class used in example repository pattern implementations but this is to make things DRY (Don't-Repeat-Yourself) by inheriting from the base class ( GenericRepository in your case) to more specialized child classes.

Only using the generic, base class GenericRepository assumes that your repositories will only ever need the most basic CRUD methods. For a more complex system, each repository becomes more specialized based on underlying business entities data requirements.

Also, you will need to have interfaces that define your data contracts with your other layers. Using the repository pattern means you don't want to expose your concrete implementations of your repositories to your other layers.

share|improve this answer
    
Seem to be a problem with both implementations? ie What to do with more specialised queries concern with one entity type. Isn't the answer the same to both implementations. Have a more specific repository inherit from your base repository? – AnonyMouse Jul 28 '11 at 0:53
    
One of the main reasons to create a repository is to decouple the data access from the data store. However you have a property called db and in the last sentence of your post say It automatically has only one context too which leads me to believe you are not injecting the db parameter as a dependency. If you were to alter the implementation to inject (take the db parameter in the constructor for instance), you would only need one database no matter which repository implementation you choose. – Nick Larsen Jul 28 '11 at 0:59

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