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If/Else vs. Switch

I have two codes here, i just wanted to ask which of the two is better in terms of writability(ease of writing the codes) and in terms of readability (ease of understanding the codes).

switch-case:

import java.io.*;

public class Quarter{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        int day;
        String input="";

        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        System.out.print("Input a number from 1 to 3: ");

        try{
            input=in.readLine();
        }catch(IOException e){
            System.out.println("Error!");
        }
        day=Integer.parseInt(input);

        switch(day){
            case 1:
            case 2:
            case 3:
                System.out.println("1st Quarter");
                break;
            case 4:
            case 5:
            case 6:
                System.out.println("2nd Quarter");
                break;
            case 7:
            case 8:
            case 9:
            System.out.println("3rd Quarter");
            break;
            case 10:
            case 11:
            case 12:
                System.out.println("4th Quarter");
                break;
            default: System.out.println("Error!");
        }

    }
}

if-else:

import java.io.*;

public class Days{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        int day;
        String input="";

        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        System.out.print("Input a number from 1 to 12: ");

        try{
            input=in.readLine();
        }catch(IOException e){
            System.out.println("Error!");
        }
        day=Integer.parseInt(input);

        if(day>=1 && day<=3){
            System.out.println("1st Quarter");
        }else
        if(day>=4 && day<=6){
            System.out.println("2nd Quarter");
        }else
        if(day>=7 && day<=9){
            System.out.println("3rd Quarter");
        }else
        if(day>=10 && day<=12){
            System.out.println("4th Quarter");
        }else
            System.out.println("Error!");
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by David Hoerster, Jonah, ig0774, Carlos Heuberger, Graviton Jul 28 '11 at 14:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Not quite a duplicate as that is for c# and this is java so java searchers would not find the original –  Mark Jul 28 '11 at 9:16
    
I've noticed quite a few questions asking the same thing, but for a different language. Maybe someone should make a community wiki question, and have an answer which covers the question for each language? –  Wipqozn Jul 28 '11 at 10:53
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7 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Neither, I'd do this one:

String[] out = {
    "1st Quarter",
    "2nd Quarter",
    "3rd Quarter",
    "4th Quarter"
};

if (1 <= day && day <= 12) {
    System.out.println(out[(day - 1) / 3]);
} else {
    System.out.println("Error!");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I agree, doing this is much cleaner than using if or switch blocks. –  fireshadow52 Jul 28 '11 at 1:09
4  
There are 12 months to put into 4 bins, so we should be dividing by 3. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 28 '11 at 1:13
7  
I support this answer, however to make it better: System.out.println((day>0 && day<13) ? out[(day-1)/3] : "Error!" ) ; –  emory Jul 28 '11 at 1:13
2  
+1 This is awesome! –  Eng.Fouad Jul 28 '11 at 2:35
5  
Your code is great, but I can't +1 it on account of the fact that you didn't answer the switch/case vs. if/else question, which could have been merely theoretical in nature. This answer unfortunately isn't going to help him next time he faces a switch/case or if/else situation where doing something like this is not possible. –  TimFoolery Jul 28 '11 at 4:09
show 5 more comments
  • Avoid the need for the logic to branch in the first place. Table lookup is often a useful technique. Arithmetic manipulation is also important - look for a pattern in the values you care about, and a function that transforms them into something simpler. Also consider polymorphism in more complex cases.

  • If you are handling all the exceptions the same way, then do it in the same place.

  • Scope variables tightly where possible.

  • Prompt for the input you actually want, FFS. :)

import java.io.*;

public class Quarter {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            System.out.print("Input the month number (1 = January, 2 = February ... 12 = December): ");
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
            int month = Integer.parseInt(in.readLine());
            int quarter = (month - 1) / 3;
            String[] quarters = new String[]{ "1st", "2nd", "3rd", "4th" };
            System.out.println(quarters[quarter] + " Quarter");
        } catch (Exception e) { // IOException for non-numeric, or AIOOBE for out of range
            System.out.println("Error!");
        }
    }
}
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1  
(-1 - 1) / 3 == 0 –  Robert Jul 28 '11 at 2:17
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Which one would you prefer? It is your code.

I definitely prefer the switch-case, but if you have something combined or e.g. 'greater than' switch-case is not the right way to do it.

Another thing: I would write the switch case like the following, because I think it is better to read:

switch(day){
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
        System.out.println("1st Quarter");
        break;
...        
}

HTH, Andreas

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What about :

(day>=1 && day <=3) ? System.out.println("1st Quarter") :
  (day >= 4 && day <= 6) ? System.out.println("2nd Quarter") :
    (day >=7 && day <= 9) ? System.out.println("3rd Quarter") :
      (day >= 10 && day <= 12) ? System.out.println("4th Quarter") : System.out.println("Error1");

;)

You could also do this:

String val = (day>=1 && day <=3) ? "1st Quarter" :
      (day >= 4 && day <= 6) ? "2nd Quarter" :
        (day >=7 && day <= 9) ? "3rd Quarter" :
          (day >= 10 && day <= 12) ? "4th Quarter" : "Error1";
System.out.println(val);

I think either should work.

share|improve this answer
    
how do i replace that with my current code? –  Zhianc Jul 28 '11 at 1:11
    
Either one above should work. Ternary operators can either set values or evaluate. –  David Hoerster Jul 28 '11 at 1:17
1  
That's just being clever. –  cwallenpoole Jul 28 '11 at 1:42
    
That's what's cool about this site. You ask a pretty basic question and you get a bunch of interesting ways to approach it. –  David Hoerster Jul 28 '11 at 1:59
add comment

It's not clear to me if the question is about solutions to the specific code example, or about the structure in general. So, some virtues of the if-else approach for consideration.

  • if-else is more common in code overall, because the number of datatypes accepted by switch is limited and switch itself is limited to compile time values. More familiar is better for readability for a broader audience.

  • The fundamental structure doesn't change if you find your requirements changing and you need to support a different datatype. I've had to change plenty of switches on enums to string compares in my time when someone added a requirement that the users be able to configure the options.

  • The need to use break; properly inside switches introduces opportunities for odd bugs that only show up in corner cases as the switches grow large and complicated.

Of course personally being an enterprise programmer I would have created a timeUnitSubDivisionResolvingVisitor ... :)

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String[] suffix = new String[]{ "st", "nd", "rd", "th" };
System.out.println((1 <= day && day <= 12)?
    String.format("%d%s Quarter", (day-1)/3+1, suffix[(day-1)/3]):
    "Error!"
);
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just an alternative way of implementing it is through a Map. It will make it configurable especially is you're using Spring where you can have this Map variable setup in your bean.xml if you decide to.

Anyway here is the alternative:

Map<Integer, String> m = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
m.put(1, "1st Quarter");
m.put(2, "1st Quarter");
m.put(3, "1st Quarter");
m.put(4, "2nd Quarter");
m.put(5, "2nd Quarter");
m.put(6, "2nd Quarter");
m.put(7, "3rd Quarter");
m.put(8, "3rd Quarter");
m.put(9, "3rd Quarter");
m.put(10, "4th Quarter");
m.put(11, "4th Quarter");
m.put(12, "4th Quarter");

System.out.println(m.get(d));
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