Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My project involved a lot of reflection. So, I cached delegates in dictionaries. The problem is that I chose to use MethodInfo as dict keys, I've tried to use a look-up method, which is something like this:

Func<T,R> LookUp(Func<T,R> m)
{
  return (Func<T,R>)dict[m.Method];
}
//LookUp(MyCls.Method)

But, after doing some tests, I found out that feeding the LookUp method with a function address, i.e, creating transitional delegates on the fly, is kinda slow,very slow indeed:

class MyCls
{
    public static void Operate(int whatever){ }
}

class MainClass
{
    delegate void Doer<T>(T arg);
    static Dictionary<MethodInfo,Delegate> _dict = new Dictionary<MethodInfo,Delegate>();

public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        Action<int> dg = MyCls.Operate;
        _dict[dg.Method] = Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Action<int>),dg.Method);

        //performance test
        var start = Environment.TickCount;          
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            //LookUp(dg);//11               
            //LookUp<int>(MyCls.Operate);//1503
            //new MyCls();//431
        }

        Console.WriteLine (Environment.TickCount-start);
    }
    static  Action<T> LookUp<T>(Action<T> dg) 
    {
        //should return (Action<T>)_dict[dg.Method];
        return null;
    }

So, the question is: To improve the performance, should I change my approach, and write some unsafe code (Are function pointers even supported by c#?) or is there alternative c#-style solutions for this kind of situations?

Please, help me out of there!

share|improve this question
    
I think you need to provide a bit more information. I dont see any direct relation between the first and second block of code, for one. How are using this dictionary? Also Im assuming those integers commented out next to each operation is the duration each took to complete? If passing a method group is slower, then just pass dg. –  Sean Thoman Jul 28 '11 at 3:54
    
Sorry, the testing snippet is a little confusing. I've rewritten it to fit my real intention. However that's all irrelevant. My concern is bout passing the function address to the LookUp method, since it will create a delegate automatically every time been called, and the creation of delegates is quite expensive, I thought it might be better to to skip this step, use function addresses and pointers directly, or something. Besides, the Type.GetMethod is also sluggish. Maybe I should use strings or enums as keys for the dict of cached delegates. –  Need4Steed Jul 28 '11 at 4:55
    
I really don't understand the point of the LookUp method. If you already have the Func<T, R> to pass in as a parameter, why do you need to look it up? –  Sean Thoman Jul 28 '11 at 7:51
    
The point is about caching. Not all methods are transparent to the client side (i.e. setters), a lot of them are referenced by the names provided by the corresponding attributes, while some of them are visible to the client. I tried to overload the LookUp method so that I can treat all of them in a same manner. Well,this solution seems kinda stupid. It looks like I need to review the design. –  Need4Steed Jul 28 '11 at 8:36

3 Answers 3

I used a class some time ago for event aggregation (Mediator) in a Winform application that had a dictionary cache of Type as key and Delegate as Value. The class looks something like...

public sealed class EventAggregator
    {
        #region Fields

        private readonly Dictionary<Type, List<Object>> subscribers = new Dictionary<Type, List<Object>>();

        #endregion

        #region Public Methods

        public void Subscribe<TMessage>(Action<TMessage> handler)
        {
            if (subscribers.ContainsKey(typeof(TMessage)))
            {
                var handlers = subscribers[typeof(TMessage)];
                handlers.Add(handler);
            }
            else
            {
                var handlers = new List<Object> {handler};
                subscribers[typeof(TMessage)] = handlers;
            }
        }

        public void Unsubscribe<TMessage>(Action<TMessage> handler)
        {
            if (subscribers.ContainsKey(typeof(TMessage)))
            {
                var handlers = subscribers[typeof(TMessage)];
                handlers.Remove(handler);

                if (handlers.Count == 0)
                {
                    subscribers.Remove(typeof(TMessage));
                }
            }
        }

        public void Publish<TMessage>(TMessage message)
        {
            if (subscribers.ContainsKey(typeof(TMessage)))
            {
                var handlers = subscribers[typeof(TMessage)];
                foreach (Action<TMessage> handler in handlers)
                {
                    handler.Invoke(message);
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion
    }

which i guess is somewhat similar to what you are trying to do.

Instead of looking up on the delegate itself, try looking up on the type which that delegate is required for.

share|improve this answer

In general using Interfaces will always be better from a performance perspective than using delegates/reflection.
Do you have control of the objects to use an interface instead of delegates?

share|improve this answer

Delegates are reference types that encapsulate a function, so essentially they are function pointers.

It seems to me that you are trying to achieve a sort of function repository. If all the functions are going to match the signature of Func then use that and dont use the generic Delegate class.

Alternatively if you want to store all different kinds of delegates with different signatures, using the Delegate class, you should probably use the .DynamicInvoke() method and instead of MethodInfo as your key use something simpler, like a string, or the functions return value, or some combo thereof.

Here's a simple example of what I mean with various techniques for LookUp,

class FunctionRepository : List<Delegate> // could also be a Dictionary<,>
{
    public R Invoke<R>(string name, params object[] args)
    {
        var _delegate = this.Single(x => x.Method.ReturnType == typeof(R)
            && x.Method.Name == name);

        return (R)_delegate.DynamicInvoke(args);
    }  

    public Func<R> LookUp<R>(string name, params object[] args)
    { 
        var _delegate = this.Single(x => x.Method.ReturnType == typeof(R) 
            && x.Method.Name == name);

        return () => (R)_delegate.DynamicInvoke(args); 
    }

    public Func<Object[], R> LookUp<R>(string name)
    { 
        var _delegate = this.Single(x => x.Method.ReturnType == typeof(R) 
            && x.Method.Name == name);

        return (args) => (R)_delegate.DynamicInvoke(args); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Dynamic invokes are unbearably slow,it totally missed the point to cache, I actually made all cached functions with params and return value comply certain interface. Because boxing/unboxing are much more cheaper than dynamic thing, store various delegates as Delegates isn't that bad. Thanks anyway. –  Need4Steed Jul 29 '11 at 0:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.