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Verbeia opened up a rather interesting discussion on the performance of the functional programming style in Mathematica. It can be found here: What is the most efficient way to construct large block matrices in Mathematica?)

I'm working on a problem, and after doing some timing of my code one particularly time consuming portion is where I calculate entries of a matrix through a recurrence relation:

c = Table[0, {2L+1}, {2L+1}];

c[[1, 1]] = 1;
Do[c[[i, i]] = e[[i - 1]] c[[i - 1, i - 1]], {i, 2, 2 L + 1}];
Do[c[[i, 1]] = (1 - e[[i - 1]]) c[[i - 1, 1]], {i, 2, 2 L + 1}];
Do[c[[i, j]] = (1 - e[[i - 1]]) c[[i - 1, j]] + 
    e[[i - 1]] c[[i - 1, j - 1]], {i, 2, 2 L + 1}, {j, 2, i - 1}];

Where e is some externally defined list. Is there any way I could write this in a more efficient manner? I can't seem to find any obvious way of using the built in functions to accomplish this in a more idiomatic and efficient way.

I realize I can only do so much, since this code is O(n^2), but I have a series of matrix multiplications (About 6 in all) that, combined, take less time to run than this statement. Anything I can do to speed this up even slightly would make an appreciable difference in run times for me.

Update: In line with what acl recommended, I tried using Compile to speed up my expressions. For a relatively small L = 600, I get 3.81 seconds on the naive Do[...], 1.54 seconds for plain old Compile, and 0.033 seconds for Compile[..., CompilationTarget->"C"].

For a more realistic size of L = 1200, the timings become 16.68, 0.605, and 0.132 for Do, Compile and Compile[.., CompilationTarget->"C"] respectively. I'm able to achieve the same 2 orders of magnitude speedup that acl mentioned in his post.

share|improve this question
    
What is e? Is it predefined? If so, you could set this up pretty easily using DiagonalMatrix for the first Do loop, FoldList for the second Do loop and slightly more complex combination of Table and FoldList for the third one. I am not at home and don't have access to a Mathematica installation now, so I can't code it up for you just at the moment. –  Verbeia Jul 28 '11 at 5:30
    
e is a list of size 2L, that I calculate in another portion of my code. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 28 '11 at 5:34
    
Now, this question is recursive. It links to the question Verbeia opened up, and vice versa. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 29 '11 at 1:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try Compile. Here I define 3 functions: f as you defined it, fc compiled (to some sort of bytecode) and fcc compiled to C (look up the documentation as to how to examine the generated code).

First, make mma tell us if something can't be compiled:

SetSystemOptions["CompileOptions"->"CompileReportExternal"->True]

then the functions:

ClearAll[f];
f=Function[{ell,e},
    Module[{c=Table[0,{2ell+1},{2ell+1}]},
        c[[1,1]]=1;
        Do[c[[i,i]]=e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,i-1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,1]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,j]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,j]]+e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,j-1]],
            {i,2,2 ell+1},{j,2,i-1}];
        c
    ]
];


ClearAll[fc];
fc=Compile[{{ell,_Integer},{e,_Integer,1}},
    Module[{c},
        c=Table[0,{2ell+1},{2ell+1}];
        c[[1,1]]=1;
        Do[c[[i,i]]=e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,i-1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,1]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,j]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,j]]+e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,j-1]],
            {i,2,2 ell+1},{j,2,i-1}];
        c
    ]
];

ClearAll[fcc];
fcc=Compile[{{ell,_Integer},{e,_Integer,1}},
    Module[{c},
        c=Table[0,{2ell+1},{2ell+1}];
        c[[1,1]]=1;
        Do[c[[i,i]]=e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,i-1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,1]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,j]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,j]]+e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,j-1]],
            {i,2,2 ell+1},{j,2,i-1}];
        c
    ],
    CompilationTarget->"C",
    RuntimeOptions->"Speed"
];

no errors, so it's OK. And now test (these on a macbook with a 2.4GHz core 2 duo running on battery):

ell=400;
e=RandomInteger[{0,1},2*ell];
f[ell,e];//Timing
fc[ell,e];//Timing
fcc[ell,e];//Timing

giving

{2.60925, Null}
{0.092022, Null}
{0.022709, Null}

so the version compiled to C is two orders of magnitude faster here.

If you change the types and get compilation errors, ask.

EDIT: If e contains reals, try

ClearAll[fc];
fc=Compile[{{ell,_Integer},{e,_Real,1}},
    Module[{c},
        c=Table[0.,{2ell+1},{2ell+1}];
        c[[1,1]]=1;
        Do[c[[i,i]]=e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,i-1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,1]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,j]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,j]]+e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,j-1]],
            {i,2,2 ell+1},{j,2,i-1}];
        c
    ]
];

ClearAll[fcc];
fcc=Compile[{{ell,_Integer},{e,_Real,1}},
    Module[{c},
        c=Table[0.,{2ell+1},{2ell+1}];
        c[[1,1]]=1;
        Do[c[[i,i]]=e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,i-1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,1]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,1]],{i,2,2 ell+1}];
        Do[c[[i,j]]=(1-e[[i-1]]) c[[i-1,j]]+e[[i-1]] c[[i-1,j-1]],
            {i,2,2 ell+1},{j,2,i-1}];
        c
    ],
    CompilationTarget\[Rule]"C",
    RuntimeOptions\[Rule]"Speed"
];

instead.

One can get a feel for how this works by saying

Needs["CompiledFunctionTools`"]
CompilePrint[fc]

and obtaining

        2 arguments
        18 Integer registers
        6 Real registers
        3 Tensor registers
        Underflow checking off
        Overflow checking off
        Integer overflow checking on
        RuntimeAttributes -> {}

        I0 = A1
        T(R1)0 = A2
        I12 = 0
        I1 = 2
        I3 = 1
        I14 = -1
        R0 = 0.
        Result = T(R2)2

1   I11 = I1 * I0
2   I11 = I11 + I3
3   I7 = I1 * I0
4   I7 = I7 + I3
5   I17 = I12
6   T(R2)2 = Table[ I11, I7]
7   I15 = I12
8   goto 13
9   I16 = I12
10  goto 12
11  Element[ T(R2)2, I17] = R0
12  if[ ++ I16 < I7] goto 11
13  if[ ++ I15 < I11] goto 9
14  R1 = I3
15  Part[ T(R2)2, I3, I3] = R1
16  I4 = I1 * I0
17  I4 = I4 + I3
18  I5 = I3
19  goto 26
20  I10 = I5 + I14
21  I8 = I10
22  R4 = Part[ T(R1)0, I8]
23  R5 = Part[ T(R2)2, I8, I8]
24  R4 = R4 * R5
25  Part[ T(R2)2, I5, I5] = R4
26  if[ ++ I5 < I4] goto 20
27  I4 = I1 * I0
28  I4 = I4 + I3
29  I5 = I3
30  goto 40
31  I10 = I5 + I14
32  I13 = I10
33  R4 = Part[ T(R1)0, I13]
34  R5 = - R4
35  R4 = I3
36  R4 = R4 + R5
37  R5 = Part[ T(R2)2, I13, I3]
38  R4 = R4 * R5
39  Part[ T(R2)2, I5, I3] = R4
40  if[ ++ I5 < I4] goto 31
41  I4 = I1 * I0
42  I4 = I4 + I3
43  I5 = I3
44  goto 63
45  I6 = I5 + I14
46  I17 = I3
47  goto 62
48  I16 = I5 + I14
49  I9 = I16
50  R4 = Part[ T(R1)0, I9]
51  R2 = R4
52  R4 = - R2
53  R5 = I3
54  R5 = R5 + R4
55  R4 = Part[ T(R2)2, I9, I17]
56  R5 = R5 * R4
57  I16 = I17 + I14
58  R4 = Part[ T(R2)2, I9, I16]
59  R3 = R2 * R4
60  R5 = R5 + R3
61  Part[ T(R2)2, I5, I17] = R5
62  if[ ++ I17 < I6] goto 48
63  if[ ++ I5 < I4] goto 45
64  Return

with the names of the registers indicating their type etc. You can also look at the generated C code if you use the "C" option (but that is a bit harder to read).

share|improve this answer
    
I was actually just trying this out. I forgot about Compile, so I decided to try doing this. I more or less followed exactly what you did here, but e is defined as a list of real numbers. If I use the head _Real in my version, or in the same exact code you posted above, I run into issues. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 28 '11 at 21:20
    
Actually, scratch that last comment. I was assuming I could use 1 and "1.0" interchangeably in the Mathematica code. Sometimes I forget Mathematica is very loose with the type of the data. I've fixed that issue, and this works well. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 28 '11 at 21:25
    
@Mike Let me know if this fixes the issues. If not, perhaps it is a packed array issue and we'll have to look at how you produce e (or pack it first) –  acl Jul 28 '11 at 21:30
    
@Mike ah, ok then! –  acl Jul 28 '11 at 21:30
    
The most probable reason I can imagine is it's compiling to some statically typed representation (Even without CompilationTarget->"C") and it's giving c an integer tensor type when I first defined it. Then, when I went ahead and started assigning stuff that was floating point type, it crapped out. Anyhow, thanks for the answer. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 28 '11 at 21:33

Given that e is already defined (as mentioned in your comment), you can get the first two steps like this:

firsttwosteps = DiagonalMatrix[FoldList[#1 * #2&, 1, e]] + 
ArrayFlatten[{{ {{0}} , {Table[0,{2L}]} }, 
{Transpose[{Rest@ FoldList[(1-#2)#1 &,1,e]}], Table[0,{2L},{2L}]}}]

That is, you set up the diagonal and the first column as required in two matrices and add them. This works because the only dependency of the second step on the first step is the element at position {1,1}.

The third step is a little trickier. If you want a purely functional solution, then it's a case of two FoldLists. And you might find it easier to build firsttwosteps in transposed form, and then transpose the upper-triangular result into a lower-triangular final result.

firsttwostepsT = DiagonalMatrix[FoldList[#1 * #2&, 1, e]] + 
ArrayFlatten[{{ {{0}} ,{Rest@ FoldList[(1-#2)#1 &,1,e]}  }, 
{ Table[0,{2L}, {1}], Table[0,{2L},{2L}]}}]

And then:

Transpose @ FoldList[With[{cim1 = #1}, 
    Most@FoldList[(1 - #2[[1]]) #1 + #2[[1]] #2[[2]] &, 0., 
    Transpose[{Join[e, {0}], cim1}]]] &, First@firsttwostepsT, Join[e, {0}]]

In the check I did, this preserved the diagonal of firsttwostepsT and produces an upper triangular matrix before it's transposed.

The reason your code is slow is that you are repeated redefining the same entire matrix by defining individual parts. As a general principle, you almost never need Do loops and ReplacePart type constructs in Mathematica. There is almost always a better way.

share|improve this answer
    
I should point out that I have never extensively tested the speed of ArrayFlatten, so there might be a more efficient matrix constructor using sparse matrices for your application. –  Verbeia Jul 28 '11 at 8:29
    
Thanks for the effort. I tried this out but unfortunately it's slower than the method I have currently. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 28 '11 at 19:10
    
Interesting: where is the slowdown? Is it ArrayFlatten? Or the Transpose in the last step? At any rate, it's given me an idea for a question. –  Verbeia Jul 28 '11 at 23:28
    
I have to pick this apart and see what's taking up all the time. I know Transpose is extremely fast even for large matrices, so I don't think it's that. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 29 '11 at 0:22
    
Sorry I'm going to be away from the computer with Mathematica this weekend so I can't help with the diagnostics till Monday at the earliest. –  Verbeia Jul 29 '11 at 1:44

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