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I need to save measures coming from devices into a SQL database (SQL Server 2008). Each device gives, at a specific time, the same array of measures. An array is composed of 80 measures, that can be grouped.

To resume, at a specific time t(x), I have the following data (t(x) considered as one "session" of measures):

  • t(0): DeviceID, DateTime, 80 measures
  • t(1): DeviceID, DateTime, 80 measures
  • ...

A device produces, in a session of measures t(x), 8 sets of same type of 10 measures (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j) (a, b ,c ... representing the type of measures as int, float, double, etc..) corresponding of 8x10=80 measures in total.

Example:

  • set N°1 can be (10, 2, 3.2f, 4.76, "Data1", 3, 2, 2.2, 5.6f, 10.0f)
  • set N°2 can be (2, 4, 31.2f, 4.23, "Data2", 1, 1, 3.2, 2.2f, 2.1f)
  • ....
  • set N°8 can be (10, 7, 1.1f, 2.35, "Data8", 8, 1, 2.1, 2.1f, 8.2f)

Note: the number of sets of measures, 8, will not change.

I would like to know what can be the best design of table(s) to handle these measures (insert, select, delete, no update)?

I thought about these possibilities:

  • It can be one table with 82 columns.
  • It can be one main table (DeviceID, DateTime) and 8 sub tables representing the 8 set of measures.
  • It can be one main table (DeviceID, DateTime) and 1 sub table that can have one set of measure, and a type to indicate which set of measures.

Thank you, Alain

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1  
The phrase "80 measures are grouped 10 by 10" is confusing enough that it is preventing me from even attempting to answer. You should edit to provide sample data of some kind instead of trying to explain it. –  Chris Cunningham Jul 28 '11 at 5:29
    
Using a NUMERIC column with the required precision may make it possible to only need to store one value -- the real one. An INT is merely a projection (with the appropriate decimal portion removed), for instance. –  user166390 Jul 28 '11 at 5:35
    
Hi Chris, I changed the "80 measures are grouped 10 by 10" to be more clear. Thank you. –  Alain Jul 28 '11 at 6:02
    
Are the 8 sets of measures uniquely identifiable (e.g. in your example data, your 5th measure ("Data1", "Data2", ...) seems like a good candidate for uniqueness, between the 8), or should all 8 be treated as "equal"? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 28 '11 at 6:03
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: In rare cases, 2 sets or more can have exactly the same values, so should be treated as "equal" –  Alain Jul 28 '11 at 6:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If every "session" consists of (8, either stable or not) number of sets where every "set" consists of (10, not-to-change) number of measurements (of possibly different types), I'd choose one table with fields:

CREATE TABLE deviceData
  ( deviceID INT
  , sessionID INT
  , setID INT
  , a int
  , b int
  , c int
  , d int
  , e int
  , f int
  , g int
  , h float
  , i float
  , j double
  , PRIMARY KEY (deviceID, sessionID, setID)
  ) ;

You can also have a deviceSession, where the date or datetime field for every session can be stored:

CREATE TABLE deviceSession
  ( deviceID INT
  , sessionID INT
  , measureTime DATETIME
  , PRIMARY KEY (deviceID, sessionID)
  ) ;

I would also add a foreign key constraint from deviceData to this table:

ALTER TABLE deviceData
  ADD FOREIGN KEY (deviceID, sessionID) 
        REFERENCES deviceSession(deviceID, sessionID)

And every INSERT could be a transaction that inserts one row at deviceSession and 8 rows at deviceData.


Sample data:

+----------+-----------+-------+---+---+----+----+---+---+----+-----+-----+-----+
| deviceID | sessionID | setID | a | b |  c |  d | e | f |  g |  h  |  i  |  j  |
+----------+-----------+-------+---+---+----+----+---+---+----+-----+-----+-----+
|    1     |     1     |   1   | 7 | 8 | -3 | 17 | 0 | 3 | -6 | 7.0 | 4.3 | 6.9 |
|    1     |     1     |   2   | 4 | 6 |  2 | 12 | 3 | 0 | -6 | 8.0 | 4.4 | 6.7 |
|    1     |     1     |   3   | 5 | 5 | -1 |  7 | 2 | 0 | -6 | 7.5 | 4.9 | 7.4 |
.................................................................................
|    1     |     1     |   8   | 0 | 9 | -6 | 29 | 0 | 7 | -6 | 7.8 | 6.3 | 7.3 |
|    1     |     2     |   1   | 5 | 4 | -6 | 29 | 9 | 7 | -6 | 7.9 | 6.3 | 4.3 |
|    1     |     2     |   2   | 4 | 3 |  2 | 12 | 3 | 0 | -6 | 8.0 | 4.4 | 6.7 |
|    1     |     2     |   3   | 5 | 5 | -1 |  8 | 2 | 0 | -6 | 7.5 | 4.9 | 7.4 |
.................................................................................
|    1     |     2     |   8   | 0 | 4 | -6 | 20 | 5 | 7 | -6 | 7.6 | 6.3 | 7.3 |
|    1     |     3     |   1   | 4 | 6 |  2 | 17 | 0 | 3 | -6 | 7.0 | 4.3 | 6.9 |
.................................................................................
.................................................................................
|    2     |     1     |   1   | 2 | 2 | -2 | 12 | 0 | 2 | -2 | 2.0 | 2.2 | 2.2 |
|    2     |     1     |   2   | 6 | 7 | -9 | 12 | 0 | 2 | -2 | 2.0 | 8.2 | 7.2 |
.................................................................................
.................................................................................
+----------+-----------+-------+---+---+----+----+---+---+----+-----+-----+-----+
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If an a measure from one set of measures might generally be compared to an a from another set (either another set within the same measure group, or from a completely different set), than all of those a values ought to be stored in the same column. If this is the case, you should definitely rule out the 82 column wide table - any reasonably complex criteria in a WHERE clause could explode if you need to consider 8 a columns, 8 c columns and 8 f columns.

The key for this table would be {DeviceID, DateTime, SetNo}.

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Hi Damien_The_Unbeliever, as I said in my comment above, only in rare cases 2 sets can be equal, but the probability to happen is very low and unfortunately not nul. But maybe in this case, I must consider all sets as disjoint, ie unique. –  Alain Jul 28 '11 at 6:59

Choose a structure that fits the queries you need to do, the meaning of the data.

If you will be working with the sets of 10 then @ypercube's answer is good. If you are doing queries which tend to work with data from all the sets, the 80 values are in some sense a "unit" then 80 columns may actually be what your data means.

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