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I know there are many security frameworks and "building" a security framework is a bad idea.

In the recent project I have worked on, I used spring security to secure the web application. In the process, I over rided/tweaked some spring security classes to fit my requirement.

My management now wants me to "takeout" the things I did and distribute it as a re usable code in an internal portal.

Now, Is this is a fair thing to ask? I tried to explain them it's just some classes build on spring security and nothing special. But they are insisting on "creating" this framework.

Is this a fair requirement ? Any ideas on how to start ? I understand that getting started with spring security is not very easy.

If I am building this, what are the functions I need to provide?

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Give them the spring-security jars and reference manual. :) –  sourcedelica Jul 30 '11 at 4:42

2 Answers 2

Just Yesterday I asked wheter someone knows a security-library which provides security-apis but at a bit lowerlevl than spring-security. Meaning a library which I call instead of a framework where I have to organize the code according to it (ie using a spring context).

So something I would need are apis for example to create safe remember-me tokens, do basic and dighest authentication, connecting to ldap - or just simply where I could use spring-security but without the spring-container).

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-1: this is not an answer. Using other peoples questions to give more visibility to your own is not a nice thing to do. –  Simeon Jul 28 '11 at 13:12
    
@Siemon His last question was "If I am building this, what are the functions I need to provide?" And I just wante do point out what form my perspecitve these would be. So what is here unfair point to my question? - I did not even link to it –  chrisichris Jul 28 '11 at 14:41

If they need you to "takeout" the things you did then they should know what they want the framework to do. So Its probably better to ask them for requirements directly.

Regarding:

Is this a fair requirement ?

The answer is probably no. If they want you to do something they should give you specific requirements.

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