Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to get into LINQ to objects as I can see the power of it. Lucky enough I have a question that I think LINQ should be able to solve.

Here is the question (the details are an example);

public class SchoolClass
{
    public int ID;
    public string Name;
    public string Teacher;
    public string RoomName;

    public string Student_Name;
    public int Student_Age;
}

As you can see by the example, there is a one to many relationship between the ClassName, Teacher and Room and the Students, i.e. there are potentially many students in the one class.

If we have a List is it possible using LINQ to create a List but have only one instance ID, Name, Teacher, RoomName and an ArrayList of Student_Name and Age?

Producing this:

public class Students
{
    public string Student_Name;
    public int Student_Age;
}

public class SchoolClass
{
    public int ID;
    public string Name;
    public string Teacher;
    public string RoomName;

    public ArrayList Students;
}

Essentially, using LINQ to clean the List to a more logical structure?

To give some background to this example. The second structure is used by a DataGrid to produce a Master-Child relationship. We store SchoolClass and StudentInformation in classes as shown above. It would be good use of LINQ to be able to convert our initial List into a structure which can be used by the DataGrid.

share|improve this question
    
Your classes are using public fields. A real no-no. Try using properties istead. "public string Teacher { get; set; }" Also, consider using a List<Students> rather than an ArrayList of Students. – andleer Mar 26 '09 at 12:22
    
why does SchoolClass hold a string field of a single Student_Name, or was this an example ? Does the class Students already exists ? how are multiple students stored now in the SchoolClass class hierarchy? – Martijn Laarman Mar 26 '09 at 12:22
    
@Andrew - agreed – Marc Gravell Mar 26 '09 at 12:27
    
I'm not sure I understand the exercise you've posed. Are you saying that you want to use LINQ to project a denormalised relation into two normalised relations, which is more or less the opposite operation to a join? – Peter Wone Mar 26 '09 at 12:49
    
I was going to add a line at the end of the question to note that the example class is an example only. If using such a class in real life than yes the properties would have Getters and Setters. – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 12:59
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I changed the ArrayList to List<Students>, and:

    List<SourceData> source = new List<SourceData>();
    //...your data here ;-p
    var classes = (from row in source
                  group row by new {
                          row.ID, row.Name,
                          row.Teacher, row.RoomName }
                      into grp
                      select new SchoolClass
                      {
                          ID = grp.Key.ID,
                          Name = grp.Key.Name,
                          Teacher = grp.Key.Teacher,
                          RoomName = grp.Key.RoomName,
                          Students = new List<Students>(
                              from row in grp
                              select new Students
                              {
                                  Student_Age = row.Student_Age,
                                  Student_Name = row.Student_Name
                              })
                      }).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
i can use this .. thanks – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 13:00
    
what if the SchoolClass had additional properties which were not needed for the grouping but should be present in the final result List. i.e. TeacherFirstName, TeacherLastName etc ... grouping on just a few properties is enough. – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 13:06
    
Well, which would you choose (there could be multiple different hits). But in that case, you could use: Teacher = grp.Select(x=>x.Teacher).First() – Marc Gravell Mar 26 '09 at 13:09
    
there will not be multiple Teachers for SchoolClass, only one per class no need to worry about First(). Question was related to having many properties in SchoolClass which will only appear once. – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 13:15
    
Do I have to list every property in the group clause and then again in the select statement. This make maintaining the LINQ cumbersome if new properties are added to SchoolClass ... excellent help so far – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 13:16

If I'm understanding this correctly, I would've thought the best way to implement the SchoolClass class would be to create a Student class (probably a LINQ-to-SQL entity, if you're using it) and to have a generic list of type student, something similar to this:

public class SchoolClass
{    
    public int ID;    
    public string Name;    
    public string Teacher;    
    public string RoomName;    
    public List<Student> Students;
}

The list of students could then be populated using a linq query, although I'm not sure exactly how without more information.

Hope this is some help.

share|improve this answer
    
lets just assume that List<SchoolClass> may contain 50 SchoolClass and we just need to put all the Student information into a subList so that we have one SchoolClass and an ArrayList for Students 50 deep. – Fleming Mar 26 '09 at 12:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.