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I am looking for a tool to read several FIFOs at once (probably using select(2)) and output what is read, closing the stream when all the FIFOs are closed. To be more precise, the program would behave as follows:

$ mkfifo a b
$ program a b > c &
$ echo 'A' > a
$ echo 'B' > b
[1]  + done       program a b > c
$ cat c
A
B
$ program a b > c &
$ echo 'B' > b
$ echo 'A' > a
[1]  + done       program a b > c
$ cat c
B
A

My first attempt was to use cat, but the second example will not work (echo 'B' > b will hang), because cat reads from each argument in order, not simultaneously. What is the correct tool to use in this case?

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tail will do that.

Use:

tail -q -n +1 a b

Edit: Sorry that didn't work. I'll see if I can find something else.

Sorry, I could not find anything.

If you don't want to program this yourself then my suggestion is multiple commands:

#!/bin/sh
rm c
cat a >> c &
cat b >> c &
wait

You may get some interleaving but otherwise everything should work fine. The wait is to prevent the program from exiting till all the cat programs are done (just in case you have some command you need to run after everything is done). And the rm is to make sure c starts empty since the cat commands append to the file.

share|improve this answer
    
This is disappointingly ugly, especially since I intend this to be part of a pipe. :-P There has to be an elegant way. Thanks for your help, in any case! – a3nm Jul 28 '11 at 7:36
1  
You could program it yourself ;) It's actually not that hard to do. There is no reason you can't use this in a pipe BTW, just save it as a shell script and call it in the pipe. – Ariel Jul 28 '11 at 7:42
    
Getting everything exactly right is hard, though, which is why I hope that someone already did the job. As for using it in a pipe, it loses much of its charm if I have to write part of the pipe as a separate script. :-) – a3nm Jul 28 '11 at 7:44

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