Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this example to generate unique objects into a vector :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

int v=0;

struct A
{
    A() : refValue( v++)
    { std::cout<<"constructor refValue="<<refValue<<std::endl; }
    A( const A &r ) : refValue(r.refValue)
    { std::cout<<"copy constructor refValue="<<refValue<<std::endl; }
    A& operator=( const A &r )
    {
        refValue = r.refValue;
        std::cout<<"operator= refValue="<<refValue<<std::endl;
        return *this;
    }
    ~A() { std::cout<<"destructor refValue="<<refValue<<std::endl; }

    int refValue;
};

A GenerateUnique()
{
    A unique;
    return unique;
}
struct B
{
    B( const int n) : v()
    {
        std::generate_n( std::back_inserter( v ), n, &GenerateUnique );
    }
    std::vector< A > v;
};

int main()
{
    B b(3);
}

If I change my main into this :

struct B
{
    B( const int n) : v(n)
    {
    }
    std::vector< A > v;
};

then one object of type A will be copied into all vector elements.

Is there a way to create a vector with all unique objects (like in the 1st example)?

To make it more clear : I have a class containing a vector. This vector must contain all unique objects (not a copy of one object). And I would like to initialize it in the initialization list (not in the body of the constructor).

share|improve this question
    
I know I could use boost::assign::list_of, but for that but you have to know the number at compile time. I need a solution which works works at run time. –  BЈовић Jul 28 '11 at 7:25
    
As written, this really doesn't make sense. Perhaps you're confusing C++ and Java? Because in C++, std::vector<A> contains distinct objects, not references to them. Therefore, a vector<A> with N members contains N distinct objects, not N pointers to a single object. –  MSalters Jul 28 '11 at 7:29
    
@MSalters Right, but it contains N copies of the same object. Would you suggest an edit to make it clearer? –  BЈовић Jul 28 '11 at 7:30
    
I'm not sure. It currently looks like A() != A() which is rather counter-intuitive. You could move the state into GenerateUnique(). However, in that case your std::generate_n() solution is in fact idiomatic. –  MSalters Jul 28 '11 at 7:33
    
Why do you want to avoid the constructor body? IMO it exists exactly for what you're doing: non-trivial initialization. If you really wanted, turn your first main into a function that returns as, then you can just copy-initialize, but then you might as well just do it in the constructor body. –  GManNickG Jul 28 '11 at 7:33

3 Answers 3

Your first attempt is the one that works.

In the current standard C++03 this line

std::vector< A > as( n ); 

is explicitly defined to create one A object and copy that n times.

I belive that in C++0x this is changed to create n default constructed As (a small difference). Then you might perhaps be able to do something in As constructor to make each instance unique.

Right now you cannot.

share|improve this answer
    
on c++0x, en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector/vector mentions this (3rd constructor), it says that it makes copies anyway (a bit controversial as why then create a separate constructor). Is than incorrect? Do you have a link to c++0x standard's statement about this? –  unkulunkulu Jul 28 '11 at 7:33
    
@unkulunkulu from n3290, 23.3.6.2 vector constructors, copy, and assignment [vector.cons]: 3. Effects: Constructs a vector with n value-initialized elements. –  Luc Danton Jul 28 '11 at 7:46
    
Seems like an error in the description here : en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector/vector –  BЈовић Jul 28 '11 at 7:52
    
Nope, that's not an error. The third constructor is used only when explicitly asked (no implicit conversions apply), whereas the second can take advantage of the implicit conversions, thus the distinction –  user283145 Sep 2 '11 at 18:57

It gets copied because that constructor's signature is as follows:

​explicit vector( size_type count,
             const T& value = T(),
             const Allocator& alloc = Allocator());

It is evident that you just pass a default-constructed object to this constructor and it copies it.

If you want to initialize in the initializer list, you are limited to constructors of some objects, obviously. I guess, you wouldn't like to create a wrapper class just to initialize the vector in initializer list, soo we are limited to vector's constructors. The only one that seems reasonable is

template <class InputIterator>

vector( InputIterator first, InputIterator last,
        const Allocator& alloc = Allocator() );

So you can create an iterator to return the needed number of default-constructed objects.

I suggest just constructing in the constructor body though.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I haven't thought about the constructor's signature. –  BЈовић Jul 28 '11 at 7:36
    
Maybe the last definition could be used with boost function input iterators? –  KillianDS Jul 28 '11 at 7:40

As already commented, you could use make_function_input_iterator from boost as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <boost/iterator/function_input_iterator.hpp>

// A && GenerateUnique the same ...
struct B
{
    B( const int n) : v(boost::make_function_input_iterator(&GenerateUnique, 1), boost::make_function_input_iterator(&GenerateUnique, n))
    {
    }
    std::vector< A > v;
};

int main()
{
    B b(3);
}

Note however that when I tested the code I saw a bit more copy constructing/operator= going on than in your first solution. Next to that, also an additional object (refvalue 3) was created (for the last "stop" iterator). I do not know if this additional behaviour is feasible, but it does the trick of initializing the vector in your initializer list if you really want it.

share|improve this answer
    
As said by Bo Persson, the current version of c++ (c++03) provides no other ways of doing that. Your version seems to be the only way. –  BЈовић Jul 28 '11 at 12:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.