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I'm trying to execute external command from java code, but there's a difference I've noticed. when running the code:

Process qq=Runtime.getRuntime().exec(
    installation_path + 
    uninstall_path + 
    uninstall_command + 
    uninstall_arguments
);
qq.waitFor();

the exitValue is 0 and the command terminated ok.

but when I use:

Process qq=(new ProcessBuilder(
    installation_path + 
    uninstall_path + 
    uninstall_command + 
    uninstall_arguments)
).start();
qq.waitFor();

Thanks, but the second code wasn't correct. I use ProcessBuilder this way and it still doesn't work:

Process qq=(new ProcessBuilder(
    installation_path +    
    uninstall_path +
    uninstall_command,
    uninstall_arguments)
).start();
qq.waitFor();

the exit value is 1001 and the command terminates in the middle although waitFor returns.

What should I do to fix the problem with ProcessBuilder?

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1  
Please learn how to use the code formatting ({}) button. –  Andrew Thompson Jul 28 '11 at 8:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Runtime.getRuntime().exec(...) takes a single string and passes it directly to a shell or cmd.exe process. The ProcessBuilder constructors, on the other hand, take a varargs array of strings or a List of strings, where each string in the array or list is assumed to be an individual argument.

So, for example, on Windows,

Runtime.getRuntime().exec("C:\DoStuff.exe -arg1 -arg2");

will pass the line C:\DoStuff.exe -arg1 -arg2 to cmd.exe, which runs a DoStuff.exe program with the two given arguments. However,

ProcessBuilder b = new ProcessBuilder("C:\DoStuff.exe -arg1 -arg2");

will fail, unless there happens to be a program whose name is DoStuff.exe -arg1 -arg2 in C:\. Instead, you should use

ProcessBuilder b = new ProcessBuilder("C:\DoStuff.exe", "-arg1", "-arg2");

or alternatively

List<String> params = java.util.Arrays.asList("C:\DoStuff.exe", "-arg1", "-arg2");
ProcessBuilder b = new ProcessBuilder(params);
share|improve this answer
    
it still doesn't work: List<String> params = java.util.Arrays.asList(installation_path+uninstall_path+uninstall_command, uninstall_arguments); Process qq=new ProcessBuilder(params).start(); –  gal Jul 28 '11 at 9:50
2  
I can not believe that this string concatanation makes any sense: "installation_path+uninstall_path+uninstall_command". –  Angel O'Sphere Jul 28 '11 at 9:53
    
thanks, now it works –  gal Jul 28 '11 at 13:07

Look at how Runtime.getRuntime().exec() passes the String command to the ProcessBuilder. It uses a tokenizer and explodes the command into individual tokens, then invokes exec(String[] cmdarray, ......) which constructs a ProcessBuilder.

If you construct the ProcessBuilder with an array of strings instead of a single one, you'll get to the same result.

The ProcessBuilder constructor takes a String... vararg, so passing the whole command as a single String has the same effect as invoking that command in quotes in a terminal:

shell$ "command with args"
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Yes there is a difference.

  • The Runtime.exec(String) method takes a single command string that it splits into a command and a sequence of arguments.

  • The ProcessBuilder constructor takes a (varargs) array of strings. The first string is the command name and the rest of them are the arguments.

So what you are telling ProcessBuilder to do is to execute a "command" whose name has spaces and other junk in it. Of course, the operating system can't find a command with that name, and the command execution fails.

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