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Could someone please describe what's the correct way to handle the following situation:

wchar_t* buffer = new wchar_t[...];

if (!something)
{
    throw std::runtime_error("Whatever");
    // Now, at this point I'm leaking memory allocated for the 'buffer'.
}

// Perform actions.
delete[] buffer;

The obvious way to solve it means something like:

if (!something)
{
    delete[] buffer;
    throw std::runtime_error("Whatever");
}

Now - is it fine? (I suspect so, but who knows :)


P.S I do realize that there is a much better way to do it - using, boost::scoped_array or simply std::wstring, which allows the destructors called to release the allocated memory, just being curious.

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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your insight is right. The pattern

Acquire some resource
Do something
Release resource

is fundamentally wrong, since Do something can potentially throw an exception and leak the resource. Moreover, you have to remember to release the resource, which is a fertile source of errors.

The correct way, as you point, is to always use an object whose destructor releases the resource. This goes by the name of RAII in C++.

This means eg. never using delete outside destructors, or never rely on manually closing file handles, never unlock mutexes manually, etc. Learn about smart pointers, and use them whenever you can.

Note that some languages (not C++) provide a finally keyword, which permits you to execute a block of instructions irrespectively of whether an exception is thrown. C++ uses RAII, and you should never be concerned with resource release if you write proper destructors.

I have a little utility there for C++0x which allows execution of arbitrary code at block exit, should you interface once or twice with poorly written (or C) libraries.

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+1, always use std::auto_ptr, boost::shared_ptr / std::unique_ptr std::shared_ptr (both C++11) or similar for auto deletion. –  tauran Jul 28 '11 at 8:59
    
I have to disagree with the assertion that RAII means "never close manually file handles, never unlock mutexes manually, etc." RAII states that you don't have to do it manually, as it is guaranteed to be done for you. However, there may be perfectly valid cases where you might want to do it manually (for example, when you need to examine the results of a failed close). Never is a strong word. –  ToddR Jul 28 '11 at 11:52
1  
@ToddR: even if indeed you may want eg. to close a file as soon as possible, or examine failure reasons, you still have RAII as a safety net which closes the file for you if you don't reach the point where you would have closed it manually. I nonetheless changed the wording to reflect our discussion. –  Alexandre C. Jul 28 '11 at 12:18
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Where's the catch? If it's in the same scope - the delete can be handled there, otherwise your #2 is the right option. That assuming of course that you don't want to do it the right way as you yourself mentioned in the PS...

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It depends on what something is. If computing something could throw an exception, no, it wouldn't be fine. You have to take care of every resource that you acquire, either by using stack allocated variables (which are destroyed at the end of the scope) or by using smart pointers of various kinds (std library, boost, take your pick).

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The correct way is to use the RAII pattern. Rather than using a raw pointer, you should wrap that in an object that handles freeing the memory in its destructor, such as a std::wstring or std::unique_ptr.

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If you explicitly use an unwrapped new you will have to explicitly use a delete. So in this case you have to catch the exception and then call delete.

As you say the correct way is to wrap the buffer in a C++ class whose destructor will be called. For a simple buffer the class with the least overhead is probably std::vector but a smart pointer e.g. boost::scoped_ptr will work as well.

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