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So I have a timer rotates a set of images ever 5 seconds. Therefore, I am running this upon document launch.

$(document).ready(function() {
var intervalID=setInterval(function(){ 
     rotate();    
}, 5000);
});

The Rotate function simply just rotates the images. However, I also allow the user to manually select what image they are looking at. Because of this I need to cancel the SetInterval and then start it over back at 5 seconds again

What I am trying to do is cancel the interval then start it over by doing this

$('a').click(function(){
 clearInterval(intervalID);   
 intervalID=setInterval(function(){ 
     rotate();    
}, 5000);    
});

However, the code doesn't seem to reset the interval like I had hoped.

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1  
OT: Instead of setInterval(function(){rotate();}, 5000) you can write setInterval(rotate, 5000). –  Felix Kling Jul 28 '11 at 9:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just make intervalID be global variable by declaring it outside and above all functions.

With your current code its scope is limited to $(document).ready() method so it might cause the problem you describe.

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1  
-1 global variables are bad, don't use them! –  Tim Büthe Jul 28 '11 at 9:32
2  
@Tim thanks for the advice and sharing your personal opinion but until I'll see proof why they're so bad I'll keep using them. –  Shadow Wizard Jul 28 '11 at 9:47
1  
@ShadowWizard: Global variables are the slowest to access, you're possibly colliding with other scripts in the global namespace, it's tough to read code where variables are declared "somewhere" out of scope, .. shall I continue? –  jAndy Jul 28 '11 at 10:00
2  
@jAndy might be true when you have lots of code, but this doesn't look like the case here. When the initial code is simple, I prefer to stick with simple code and just moving one line to be outside a function looks like the most simple solution to me. I'm not trying to give the perfect answer/solution just something the OP will understand best and will be easy to implement. –  Shadow Wizard Jul 28 '11 at 10:07
1  
@ShadowWizard: I get your point, but even the shortest code is no excuse not to use best practices. –  jAndy Jul 28 '11 at 10:15

Well, it looks like you are declaring interverID locally within the anonymous function from your .ready() handler. I'm actually wondering why you don't face a Reference error in your click-event handler, since intervalID cannot be known there.

You need to make sure that this variable is available and does have a shared context for both functions. Easiest way to go, create an anonymous self invoking method around your script and declare that variable out of scope.

(function _myPrivateContext($, window, document, undefined) {
    var intervalID = null;

    $(document).ready(function() {
       intervalID = setInterval(rotate, 5000);
    });

    $('a').click(function(){
        clearInterval(intervalID);   
        intervalID = setInterval(rotate, 5000);    
    });

}(jQuery, window, document));
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Don't think you want to be setting onclick handlers before the DOM is loaded. You could try live(). –  Peter Ajtai Feb 5 '12 at 1:53

If the intervalID variable is declared within the .ready() scope, the following ought to work (untested):

$(document).ready(function() {
    var rotate = function() { ... },
        intervalID = setInterval(rotate, 5000);

    $('a').click(function() {
       clearInterval(intervalID);   
       intervalID = setInterval(rotate, 5000);    
    });
});
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