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When we make an object like this

function myObject(){  
Properties and methods here----
}; 

We write “function” keyword before name of object is it necessary? All objects are functions in real? Can we not write direct object name like this?

myObject(){  
Properties and methods here----
}; 
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, not all objects are functions. (All functions are objects, though.)

Here, obj isn't a function:

var obj = {
    foo: "bar"
};

Nor dt here:

var dt = new Date();

The function keyword is necessary in order to say "what follows is a function declaration or function expression." It's just part of the basic syntax of JavaScript.

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in the first case, the function can be used as the constructor for an object. So you can have:

function Person(name) {
    this.name = name
}

Person.prototype = {
    // methods can go in here
}

person1 = new Person("bob");
alert(person1.name) // alerts "bob"

It is also true that you can use a function as an object. For example:

function myObject() {
    return myObject.test;
}

myObject.test = "bob";
alert(myObject()) // would alert "bob"

but all objects are not functions.

var someObject = {
     name: "bob",
     moody: "sad"
}

alert(someObject.name); // alerts "bob"
try {
    someObject();
} catch (er) {
    alert(er);  // alerts "TypeError: object is not a function"
}

I'd suggest you take a look at https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function

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function declares a function. Because of the way JavaScript works, a function can be used as a class, to make objects.

But if you really just want an object, use squiggly braces, like this:

var myObject = {
  x : 30, // a property
  getX : function() { // a method
     return this.x;
  }
}

But your understanding of JavaScript needs a lot of work: read a few books about it.

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Not so much class but a constructor. JavaScript doesn't have classes. –  delnan Jul 28 '11 at 10:38
    
Hi Malvolio, thx for answer :) and yes i need a lot of work for understanding javascript . i am reading few books and article daily. –  Jamna Jul 28 '11 at 10:57
    
Hi delnan, so we write the keyword "function" before name of object so we can make a constructor ...ohh thats why we use keyword "new" for making a instance of "objectname"....now i got it ..thx for your support –  Jamna Jul 28 '11 at 11:00

One reason is obviously disambiguity;

function foo() 
{
    alert("cake") 
}

foo()
{
    alert("burb");
}

foo();

alerts cake, burb, cake as the 2nd foo() {...} is just a regular function call followed by a regular compound statement enclosed in {}.

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No it's not required. You can also have:

var myObject = {  
   Prop1: "Value1", 
   Prop2: "Value2", 
   Method1: function() {
      alert("hello");
   }
};

Live test case: http://jsfiddle.net/rKunx/

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You can write:

myObject = {
Properties and methods here----
}
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but i am getting error when i trying to write like this... –  Jamna Jul 28 '11 at 11:11

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