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I have hardly ever noticed a python program that uses else in a for loop.

I recently used it to perform an action based on the loop variable condition while exiting; as it is in the scope.

What is the pythonic way to use an else in a for loop? Are there any notable use cases?

And, yea. I dislike using break statement. I'd rather set the looping condition complex. Would I be able to get any benefit out of it, if I don't like to use break statement anyway.

Worth noting that for loop has an else since the language inception, the first ever version.

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Thanks for this question. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 13:35
    
Hmm, interesting. Is the for-else statement a Python specific thing or do other languages have it? I've never heard of it before (but I've never used Python, just heard many good things about it) –  Davy8 Mar 26 '09 at 14:35
    
I am trying to think of how to search for uses of this construct in the extant python source code, to see if it exists outside of SO. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 14:44
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7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

What could be more pythonic than PyPy?

Look at what I discovered starting at line 284 in ctypes_configure/configure.py:

    for i in range(0, info['size'] - csize + 1, info['align']):
        if layout[i:i+csize] == [None] * csize:
            layout_addfield(layout, i, ctype, '_alignment')
            break
    else:
        raise AssertionError("unenforceable alignment %d" % (
            info['align'],))

And here, from line 425 in pypy/annotation/annrpython.py (clicky)

if cell.is_constant():
    return Constant(cell.const)
else:
    for v in known_variables:
        if self.bindings[v] is cell:
            return v
    else:
        raise CannotSimplify

In pypy/annotation/binaryop.py, starting at line 751:

def is_((pbc1, pbc2)):
    thistype = pairtype(SomePBC, SomePBC)
    s = super(thistype, pair(pbc1, pbc2)).is_()
    if not s.is_constant():
        if not pbc1.can_be_None or not pbc2.can_be_None:
            for desc in pbc1.descriptions:
                if desc in pbc2.descriptions:
                    break
            else:
                s.const = False    # no common desc in the two sets
    return s

A non-one-liner in pypy/annotation/classdef.py, starting at line 176:

def add_source_for_attribute(self, attr, source):
    """Adds information about a constant source for an attribute.
    """
    for cdef in self.getmro():
        if attr in cdef.attrs:
            # the Attribute() exists already for this class (or a parent)
            attrdef = cdef.attrs[attr]
            s_prev_value = attrdef.s_value
            attrdef.add_constant_source(self, source)
            # we should reflow from all the reader's position,
            # but as an optimization we try to see if the attribute
            # has really been generalized
            if attrdef.s_value != s_prev_value:
                attrdef.mutated(cdef) # reflow from all read positions
            return
    else:
        # remember the source in self.attr_sources
        sources = self.attr_sources.setdefault(attr, [])
        sources.append(source)
        # register the source in any Attribute found in subclasses,
        # to restore invariant (III)
        # NB. add_constant_source() may discover new subdefs but the
        #     right thing will happen to them because self.attr_sources
        #     was already updated
        if not source.instance_level:
            for subdef in self.getallsubdefs():
                if attr in subdef.attrs:
                    attrdef = subdef.attrs[attr]
                    s_prev_value = attrdef.s_value
                    attrdef.add_constant_source(self, source)
                    if attrdef.s_value != s_prev_value:
                        attrdef.mutated(subdef) # reflow from all read positions

Later in the same file, starting at line 307, an example with an illuminating comment:

def generalize_attr(self, attr, s_value=None):
    # if the attribute exists in a superclass, generalize there,
    # as imposed by invariant (I)
    for clsdef in self.getmro():
        if attr in clsdef.attrs:
            clsdef._generalize_attr(attr, s_value)
            break
    else:
        self._generalize_attr(attr, s_value)
share|improve this answer
    
The else: clause in classdef.py:176 is unnecessary since they exit the loop via 'return'.. Incidentally, how did you locate these? Just eyeballing the source, or something smarter? –  John Fouhy Mar 26 '09 at 21:41
    
+1: Nice research! –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 26 '09 at 23:01
    
grep for (for|else) at the same level of indentation within ten lines of each other. If I had the skills of a sea cucumber, I'd figure out where in the PyPy compiler the for ... else flow control happens, add logging, and then build -all. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 27 '09 at 2:03
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If you have a for loop you don't really have any condition statement. So break is your choice if you like to abort and then else can serve perfectly to handle the case where you were not happy.

for fruit in basket:
   if fruit.kind in ['Orange', 'Apple']:
       fruit.eat()
       break
else:
   print 'The basket contains no desirable fruit'
share|improve this answer
    
You misunderstood the concept. The else block is not executed after a break. –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 26 '09 at 13:33
    
You are wrong, as else part is executed only when for completes without a break. –  Lakshman Prasad Mar 26 '09 at 13:35
    
@Ferdinand: Perhaps his explication is not perfect, but from the code you can clearly see, that it's exactly what he meant. –  vartec Mar 26 '09 at 13:36
    
@vartec: OK, you are right. To me it read like: Using the else block, you can examine the reason why you did the break. My mistake. –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 26 '09 at 13:38
    
Well, if you don't have enought total money in your wallet it will not break, hence it will say you dont have enough money. The else statement is also executed if the wallet is completely empty. –  Stefan Lundström Mar 26 '09 at 13:39
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Basically, it simplifies any loop that uses a boolean flag like this:

found = False                # <-- initialize boolean
for divisor in range(2, n):
    if n % divisor == 0:
        found = True         # <-- update boolean
        break  # optional, but continuing would be a waste of time

if found:                    # <-- check boolean
    print n, "is composite"
else:
    print n, "is prime"

and allows you to skip the management of the flag:

for divisor in range(2, n):
    if n % divisor == 0:
        print n, "is composite"
        break
else:
    print n, "is prime"

Note that there is already a natural place for code to execute when you do find a divisor - right before the break. The only new feature here is a place for code to execute when you tried all divisor and did not find any.

This helps only in conjuction with break. You still need booleans if you can't break (e.g. because you looking for the last match, or have to track several conditions in parallel).

Oh, and BTW, this works for while loops just as well.

any/all

Nowdays, if the only purpose of the loop is a yes-or-no answer, you might be able to write it much shorter with the any()/all() functions with a generator or generator expression that yields booleans:

if any(n % divisor == 0 
       for divisor in range(2, n)):
    print n, "is composite"
else:
    print n, "is prime"

Note the elegancy! The code is 1:1 what you want to say!

[This is as effecient as a loop with a break, because the any() function is short-circuiting, only running the generator expression until it yeilds True. In fact it's usually even faster than a loop. Simpler Python code tends to have less overhear.]

This is less workable if you have other side effects - for example if you want to find the divisor. You can still do it (ab)using the fact that non-0 value are true in Python:

divisor = any(d for d in range(2, n) if n % d == 0)
if divisor:
    print n, "is divisible by", divisor
else:
    print n, "is prime"

but as you see this is getting shaky - wouldn't work if 0 was a possible divisor value...

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Without using break, else blocks have no benefit for for and while statements. The following two examples are equivalent:

for x in range(10):
  pass
else:
  print "else"

for x in range(10):
  pass
print "else"

The only reason for using else with for or while is to do something after the loop if it terminated normally, meaning without an explicit break.

After a lot of thinking, I can finally come up with a case where this might be useful:

def commit_changes(directory):
    for file in directory:
        if file_is_modified(file):
            break
    else:
        # No changes
        return False

    # Something has been changed
    send_directory_to_server()
    return True
share|improve this answer
    
Still, the laster use case, doesnt seem an elegant solution, even for this case. –  Lakshman Prasad Mar 26 '09 at 14:08
    
I totally agree and frankly I have never used this construct. –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 26 '09 at 14:36
2  
But now, I predict, you are at risk of seeing opportunities to use it everywhere. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 14:42
2  
I'd probably write: "if file is modified(file): send_directory_to_server(); return True" and drop the else: clause.. –  John Fouhy Mar 26 '09 at 21:38
    
@John: Do you have a better example for the for-else construct? :) –  Ferdinand Beyer Mar 26 '09 at 22:59
show 1 more comment

Perhaps the best answer comes from the official Python tutorial:

break and continue Statements, and else Clauses on Loops:

Loop statements may have an else clause; it is executed when the loop terminates through exhaustion of the list (with for) or when the condition becomes false (with while), but not when the loop is terminated by a break statement

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I was introduced to a wonderful idiom in which you can use a for/break/else scheme with an iterator to save both time and LOC. The example at hand was searching for the candidate for an incompletely qualified path. If you care to see the original context, please see the original question.

def match(path, actual):
    path = path.strip('/').split('/')
    actual = iter(actual.strip('/').split('/'))
    for pathitem in path:
        for item in actual:
            if pathitem == item:
                break
        else:
            return False
    return True

What makes the use of for/else so great here is the elegance of avoiding juggling a confusing boolean around. Without else, but hoping to achieve the same amount of short-circuiting, it might be written like so:

def match(path, actual):
    path = path.strip('/').split('/')
    actual = iter(actual.strip('/').split('/'))
    failed = True
    for pathitem in path:
        failed = True
        for item in actual:
            if pathitem == item:
                failed = False
                break
        if failed:
            break
    return not failed

I think the use of else makes it more elegant and more obvious.

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Here you go:

a = ('y','a','y')
for x in a:
  print x,
else:
  print '!'

It's for the caboose.

edit:

# What happens if we add the ! to a list?

def side_effect(your_list):
  your_list.extend('!')
  for x in your_list:
    print x,

claimant = ['A',' ','g','u','r','u']
side_effect(claimant)
print claimant[-1]

# oh no, claimant now ends with a '!'

edit:

a = (("this","is"),("a","contrived","example"),("of","the","caboose","idiom"))
for b in a:
  for c in b:
    print c,
    if "is" == c:
      break
  else:
    print
share|improve this answer
    
Not so happy! What prevents you from putting '!' within the list, or using the print '!' without the else? –  Lakshman Prasad Mar 26 '09 at 14:05
    
If you use the 'print !' without the else, then you get the '!' even if the for loop had a break, and it is impolite to exult in the presence of a break. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 14:12
    
Also, since tuples are immutable, adding a '!' to the end of a tuple would require copying the whole thing. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 14:18
    
Ferdinand's example is better than mine because it is more flow-control-y. –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 26 '09 at 14:19
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