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I believe I've seen this somewhere, but I don't recall if it was a different language, or if I just can't remember the syntax well.

Is there a way to fall through multiple case statements without stating case value: repeatedly?

I know this works:

switch (value)
{
   case 1:
   case 2:
   case 3:
      //do some stuff
      break;
   case 4:
   case 5:
   case 6:
      //do some different stuff
      break;
   default:
       //default stuff
      break;
}

but I'd like to do something like this:

switch (value)
{
   case 1,2,3:
      //Do Something
      break;
   case 4,5,6:
      //Do Something
      break;
   default:
      //Do the Default
      break;
}

Is this syntax I'm thinking of from a different language, or am I missing something?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you don't just use an IF statement (if you are checking a range of ints)? – spoon16 Sep 16 '08 at 1:39
1  
yes charlse, the first way works fine, I've used it in numerous places. It's dirtier than I'd like, but it is useful. I just used those integers as an example. The real data was more varied. An if (1 || 2 || 3 ) {...} else if (4 || 5 || 6) {...} would have worked too, but it's harder to read. – theo Sep 16 '08 at 4:27
2  
why do you consider the latter dirtier than the former. The latter adds yet another meaning to , and one that isn't shared with any other c-style language. That would seem much dirtier to me. – Jon Hanna Oct 1 '10 at 14:04
1  
You might have picked up the 2nd's syntax from Ruby. That's how it works in that language (although switch becomes case, and case becomes when, among other things.) – juanpaco Dec 12 '12 at 16:00
    
VB has much more power in this area with its select case statement. – Jeff Bridgman Jul 15 '15 at 19:08

12 Answers 12

up vote 161 down vote accepted

There is no syntax in C++ nor C# for the second method you mentioned.

There's nothing wrong with your first method. If however you have very big ranges, just use a series of if statements.

share|improve this answer
5  
As an addition I wanted to add a link to the C# language specification available on MSDN at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/aa336809.aspx – Richard C. McGuire Sep 16 '08 at 2:20
    
User could use some if's (or a table lookup) to reduce the input to a set of enums and switch on the enum. – Harvey Jul 28 '13 at 20:00

I guess this has been already answered. However, I think that you can still mix both options in a syntactically better way by doing:

switch (value)
{
case 1: case 2: case 3:          
    // Do Something
    break;
case 4: case 5: case 6: 
    // Do Something
    break;
default:
    // Do Something
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
working solution, thanks :) – Alone89 Jan 3 '12 at 10:40
4  
Why isn't this the answer :) – Jeremy Child Jul 31 '12 at 23:21
43  
@Jeremy Child, maybe because I answered 2 years after :D – Carlos Quintanilla Aug 1 '12 at 15:26
2  
'switch' should be lower case for c#? – Austin Harris Nov 18 '13 at 8:08
1  
The collapsed code gets lengthened to the first example in the question. May as well just do it the way it is in the question. – MetalPhoenix Dec 5 '14 at 19:54

This syntax is from Visual Basic, where you can code something like this:

Dim number As Integer = 8
Select Case number
    Case 1 To 5
        Debug.WriteLine("Between 1 and 5, inclusive")
        ' The following is the only Case clause that evaluates to True.
    Case 6, 7, 8
        Debug.WriteLine("Between 6 and 8, inclusive")
    Case 9 To 10
        Debug.WriteLine("Equal to 9 or 10")
    Case Else
        Debug.WriteLine("Not between 1 and 10, inclusive")
End Select

You cannot use this syntax in C#. Instead, you must use the syntax from your first example.

share|improve this answer
31  
this is one of the few things I miss about *Basic. – nickf Oct 16 '08 at 1:57
3  
Here we have one of the few displays where visual basic is not as ugly, and is more versatile than c#. This is a valuable example! – bgmCoder Apr 14 '13 at 1:09
1  
The question is tagged as C# not VB – TheLethalCoder Aug 26 '15 at 8:43

.NET Framework 3.5 has got ranges:

Enumerable.Range from MSDN

you can use it with "contains" and the IF statement, since like someone said the SWITCH statement uses the "==" operator.

Here an example:

int c = 2;
if(Enumerable.Range(0,10).Contains(c))
    DoThing();
else if(Enumerable.Range(11,20).Contains(c))
    DoAnotherThing();

But I think we can have more fun: since you won't need the return values and this action doesn't take parameters, you can easily use actions!

public static void MySwitchWithEnumerable(int switchcase, int startNumber, int endNumber, Action action)
{
    if(Enumerable.Range(startNumber, endNumber).Contains(switchcase))
        action();
}

The old example with this new method:

MySwitchWithEnumerable(c, 0, 10, DoThing);
MySwitchWithEnumerable(c, 10, 20, DoAnotherThing);

Since you are passing actions, not values, you should omit the parenthesis, it's very important. If you need function with arguments, just change the type of Action to Action<ParameterType>. If you need return values, use Func<ParameterType, ReturnType>.

In C# 3.0 there is no easy Partial Application to encapsulate the fact the the case parameter is the same, but you create a little helper method (a bit verbose, tho).

public static void MySwitchWithEnumerable(int startNumber, int endNumber, Action action){ 
    MySwitchWithEnumerable(3, startNumber, endNumber, action); 
}

Here an example of how new functional imported statement are IMHO more powerful and elegant than the old imperative one.

share|improve this answer
2  
Good choice. One thing to note, though - Enumerable.Range has arguments int start and int count. Your examples wont work right the way they were written. You write it as if the second argument is int end. For example - Enumerable.Range(11,20) would result in 20 numbers starting with 11, and not numbers from 11 to 20. – Gabriel McAdams Aug 2 '12 at 22:46
    
although, if working with an Enum, why not something like? if(Enumerable.Range(MyEnum.A, MyEnum.M){ DoThing(); } else if(Enumerable.Range(MyEnum.N, MyEnum.Z){ DoAnotherThing(); } – DaveH Mar 6 '14 at 14:22
    
Note that Enumerable.Range(11,20).Contains(c) is equivalent to for(int i = 11; i < 21; ++i){ if (i == c) return true; } return false; If you had a large range it would take a long time, while just using > and < would be quick and constant-time. – Jon Hanna Feb 26 at 14:20

You can leave out the newline which gives you:

case 1: case 2: case 3:
   break;

but I consider that bad style.

share|improve this answer

@ Jennifer Owens: you are absolutely right the code below won't work:

case 1 | 3 | 5:
//not working do something

The only way to do this is:

case 1: case 2: case 3:
// do something
break;

The code you are looking for works on visual basic where you easily can put ranges... in none option of switch or if else blocks convenient, I'd suggest to, at very extreme point, make .dll with visual basic and import back to your c# project.

Note: switch equivalent in visual basic is select case.

share|improve this answer
1  
The edited way has already been answered – TheLethalCoder Aug 26 '15 at 8:44

One lesser known facet of switch in C# is that it relies on the operator= and since it can be overriden you could have something like this:


string s = foo();

switch (s) {
  case "abc": /*...*/ break;
  case "def": /*...*/ break;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
this could become a big gotcha later on for someone else trying to read the code – Andrew Harry Jul 12 '11 at 3:45

gcc implements an extension to the C language to support sequential ranges:

switch (value)
{
   case 1...3:
      //Do Something
      break;
   case 4...6:
      //Do Something
      break;
   default:
      //Do the Default
      break;
}

Edit: Just noticed the C# tag on the question, so presumably a gcc answer doesn't help.

share|improve this answer
1  
The question is tagged as C# – TheLethalCoder Aug 26 '15 at 8:43

Another option would be to use a routine. If cases 1-3 all execute the same logic then wrap that logic in a routine and call it for each case. I know this doesn't actually get rid of the case statements, but it does implement good style and keep maintenance to a minimum.....

[Edit] Added alternate implementation to match original question...[/Edit]

switch (x)
{
   case 1:
      DoSomething();
      break;
   case 2:
      DoSomething();
      break;
   case 3:
      DoSomething();
      break;
   ...
}

private void DoSomething()
{
   ...
}

Alt

switch (x)
{
   case 1:
   case 2:
   case 3:
      DoSomething();
      break;
   ...
}

private void DoSomething()
{
   ...
}
share|improve this answer

Actually I don't like the GOTO command too, but it's in official MS materials, here are all allowed syntaxes.

If the end point of the statement list of a switch section is reachable, a compile-time error occurs. This is known as the "no fall through" rule. The example

switch (i) {
case 0:
   CaseZero();
   break;
case 1:
   CaseOne();
   break;
default:
   CaseOthers();
   break;
}

is valid because no switch section has a reachable end point. Unlike C and C++, execution of a switch section is not permitted to "fall through" to the next switch section, and the example

switch (i) {
case 0:
   CaseZero();
case 1:
   CaseZeroOrOne();
default:
   CaseAny();
}

results in a compile-time error. When execution of a switch section is to be followed by execution of another switch section, an explicit goto case or goto default statement must be used:

switch (i) {
case 0:
   CaseZero();
   goto case 1;
case 1:
   CaseZeroOrOne();
   goto default;
default:
   CaseAny();
   break;
}

Multiple labels are permitted in a switch-section. The example

switch (i) {
case 0:
   CaseZero();
   break;
case 1:
   CaseOne();
   break;
case 2:
default:
   CaseTwo();
   break;
}

I believe in this particular case, the GOTO can be used, it's actually the only way to fallthrough.

source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664749%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

share|improve this answer

An awful lot of work seems to have been put into finding ways to get one of C# least used syntaxes to somehow look better or work better. Personally I find the switch statement is seldom worth using. I would strongly suggest analyzing what data you are testing and the end results you are wanting.

Let us say for example you want to quickly test values in a known range to see if they are prime numbers. You want to avoid having your code do the wasteful calculations and you can find a list of primes in the range you want online. You could use a massive switch statement to compare each value to known prime numbers.

Or you could just create an array map of primes and get immediate results:

    bool[] Primes = new bool[] {
        false, false, true, true, false, true, false,    
        true, false, false, false, true, false, true,
        false,false,false,true,false,true,false};
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        int Value = Convert.ToInt32(textBox1.Text);
        if ((Value >= 0) && (Value < Primes.Length)) {
            bool IsPrime = Primes[Value];
            textBox2.Text = IsPrime.ToString();
        }
    }

Maybe you want to see if a character in a string is hexadecimal. You could use an ungly and somewhat large switch statement.

Or you could use either regular expressions to test the char or use the IndexOf function to search for the char in a string of known hexadecimal letters:

        private void textBox2_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        try {
            textBox1.Text = ("0123456789ABCDEFGabcdefg".IndexOf(textBox2.Text[0]) >= 0).ToString();
        } catch {
        }
    }

Let us say you want to do one of 3 different actions depending on a value that will be the range of 1 to 24. I would suggest using a set of IF statements. And if that became too complex (Or the numbers were larger such as 5 different actions depending on a value in the range of 1 to 90) then use an enum to define the actions and create an array map of the enums. The value would then be used to index into the array map and get the enum of the action you want. Then use either a small set of IF statements or a very simple switch statement to process the resulting enum value.

Also, the nice thing about an array map that converts a range of values into actions is that it can be easily changed by code. With hard wired code you can't easily change behaviour at runtime but with an array map it is easy.

share|improve this answer
    
You could also map to lambda expression or a delegate – Conrad Frix Oct 26 '12 at 5:56

For this, you would use a goto statement. Such as:

    switch(value){
    case 1:
        goto case 3;
    case 2:
        goto case 3;
    case 3:
        DoCase123();
    //This would work too, but I'm not sure if it's slower
    case 4:
        goto case 5;
    case 5:
        goto case 6;
    case 6:
        goto case 7;
    case 7:
        DoCase4567();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it is. This works in C# – scone Aug 28 '11 at 22:51
2  
um... why is that? – scone Sep 2 '12 at 2:59
6  
@scone goto breaks a fundamental principal of procedural programming (of which c++ and c# are still rooted in; theyre not pure OO languages (thank God)). Procedural programming has a well defined flow of logic determined by language constructs and method calling conventions (how the runtime stack grows and shrinks). The goto statement circumvents this flow by allowing arbitrary jumping around, basically. – Samus Arin Dec 4 '12 at 16:27
    
I'm not saying it's good style, persay, but it does what the original question was asking for. – scone Sep 10 '15 at 20:11

protected by Lalit Kumar B Aug 26 '15 at 8:29

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