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I am implementing exclusive arc pattern of resolving multiple parents for a given table. I wrote the below table level check constraint for use in SQL Server 2008. The proble with this, if there are 3 columns, the query grows so much bigger. Is there any better to do it?

check( 
(Parent1Id is null AND Parent2Id is not null) 
OR  (Parent1Id is not null AND Parent2Id is null))
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about check(COALESCE(Parent1ID, Parent2ID) IS NOT NULL) - this makes sure at least one is set, but to do the negative check I can't think of a quick solution.

Come to think of it, how about: (warning - not much shorter)

check(
CASE WHEN Parent1ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
+ CASE WHEN Parent2ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
+ CASE WHEN Parent3ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
+ CASE WHEN Parent4ID IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
= 1
)
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@CK, Thanks. Yes the alternative you proposed is longer. –  Siraj Samsudeen Jul 28 '11 at 12:33
    
@CK, thanks for the coalesce function. What if I add another check constraint which checks for all the values NOT (A is not null AND B is not null). Can you put a NOT in the check constraint? Also, this query will also become a complex if 3 columns are involved. –  Siraj Samsudeen Jul 28 '11 at 12:35
    
The alternative is longer than the code you have, but for anything more than 2 values, it will be shorter (i.e. 3 lines for mine, 3 using your approach [but your lines will be longer, 4 lines for mine, 4 very long lines for yours]) –  cjk Jul 28 '11 at 12:43
    
Your NOT won't work as there will be multiple combinations for 3 or more columns. I suggest you try your approach for 3 or more columns, then look at my second answer again. –  cjk Jul 28 '11 at 12:45

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