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I have a very large loop that loops a 1000 rows. I exit the loop if magic value 1 is found. If magic value 1 is not found but magic value 2 is found then the loop needs to skip to the beginning. Right now I am using a switch, some ifs and a goto. I have read that goto is not the best way. Is there a better way to make this work?

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Please post some code. It'll help us visualize and improve it. –  Wadih M. Mar 26 '09 at 14:10
    
by "skip to the beginning", do you mean restart the loop on the next iteration, or restart the loop on the first iteration? –  Greg Mar 26 '09 at 14:12
    
It would probably help if you gave some example code and what you actually want to achieve. What you describe sounds like some pretty bad coding... –  Simon Lehmann Mar 26 '09 at 14:12
    
Is the data in the rows constantly changing? I don't understand why you are starting from the beginning again if value 2 is found... –  0xA3 Mar 26 '09 at 14:12
1  
If you loop back to the beginning when you hit a value of 2, wont it result in an infinite loop? –  DaveK Mar 26 '09 at 14:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

To exit a loop you can use the break statement, to go onto the next record you can use the continue statement.

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    if(magicValue1)
       break;
    if(magicValue2)
       continue;
}

I AM NOT CONDONING THE USE OF THE GOTO STATEMENT I AM SIMPLY POINTING OUT A POSSIBLE USE CASE

You can use goto jump statement to start/exit a loop, however I would stay away from this option unless you are using nested looping. I think the goto statement still has its uses for optimizing, exiting cleanly ect.. but in general it is best to use it quite sparingly.

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{ 
  start:

  for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
  {
     if(magicValue1)
       goto end;
    if(magicValue2)
       goto start;
  }
}
end :
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1  
-1, goto may have its uses but this isn't one them. In all cases like this you can refactor the nested loops into a separate method and use return. –  Samuel Mar 26 '09 at 14:21
    
    
Points 1 and 2 are not right. For 1 you could just wrap it in a try {} finally {} block and it would look much better and see my other comment for number 2. –  Samuel Mar 26 '09 at 14:29
2  
+1 For being able to have the ability to explain a concept without advocating its usage in all cases. –  Andrew Hare Mar 26 '09 at 14:29
2  
In this particular case, there is nothing evil about goto - it is not fundamentally different to break and continue (the latter just happen to use an implicit label). If you oppose the use of goto in such cases, you should oppose break and continue as well. –  Pavel Minaev Jul 31 '09 at 23:35

How about this:

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    if(values[i] == MAGIC_VALUE_1) {
        break;
    } else if(values[i] == MAGIC_VALUE_2) {
        i = 0;
    }
}

If by "skip to the beginning" you mean "skip this record and process the next one," replace i = 0 with continue.

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was just doing that with a While loop instead –  Pondidum Mar 26 '09 at 14:12
    
The only problem with this (and it will probably be a problem with the original author's wording of the problem), is that once you hit magic value 2, it will start all over until it hits magic value 2, then it will start all over, infinitely. Your code is definitely right, based on what he is saying –  TheTXI Mar 26 '09 at 14:14
    
I'd actually recommend using a while loop for this, as most people expect the 3rd statement in the for loop to be the only thing that modifies the index variable. A while loop would not induce that preconception and thus be easier to grok. –  rmeador Mar 26 '09 at 14:15
    
@TheTXI: Perhaps he's modifying the data, so on the next run the values are different. According to the question this answer is a valid one. –  Pawel Krakowiak Mar 26 '09 at 14:16
    
@TheTXI: I think the OP must be modifying the values in the loop. Otherwise, this obviously results in an infinite loop, as you and DaveK have pointed out. –  Can Berk Güder Mar 26 '09 at 14:16

A while variation with no break:

bool continue = true; int i = 0;
while (i < 1000 && continue){
    if(values[i] == MAGIC_VALUE_1) {
        continue=false;
    } else if(values[i] == MAGIC_VALUE_2) {
        i = 0;
    }
    i++;
}
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I can't comment yet ( 1 rep point away)

but wouldn't this be better:

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    if (magicValue1)
    {
       break;
    }
    else if (magicValue2)
    {
       dosomething();
       i=0;
    }
}

and I'm not sure by whats meant by "restart the search".

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The original post is tagged C#, so you'd want "else" instead of "Else". And your if statements need to compare the magicValues to something, like: if(values[i]==magicValue1) –  JeffH Mar 26 '09 at 15:13
    
It was meant to be sudo code. –  Crash893 Mar 26 '09 at 16:56
    
Added punctuation and reformatted your code. –  Bevan Jul 31 '09 at 23:19

I'm taking #2 case to mean that you want to not perform (i.e. skip) the loop body in the #2 case and not that you want to reset the loop to 0. (See the code comments if I've got that backward.)

This suggestion may be controversial because of the less conventional condition in the for loop could be said to be low on the self-documenting scale, but if that doesn't bother you, a concise way of writing what I think you you want is:

        for (int i= 0; i<values.Length && values[i]!= MAGIC_1; i++)
        {
            if (values[i] == MAGIC_2)
            {
                // Don't do the loop body for this case but continue on looping
                continue;
                // If you want to reset the loop to zero instead of skip the 2 case,
                // comment-out the continue; and un-comment the line below:
                // i=0;
            }
            // Do long loop body here
        }
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Just note that if you set the counter back to 0 if MagicValue is 2, and your code never changes the values, you are probably going to be in an infinite loop.

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A more complex could be:

We define 2 Extension Methods.

public static class Extensions
{
   public static bool isMagic_1(this int i)
   {
         return i == 1;
   }

   public static bool isMagic_2(this int i)
   {
         return i == 2;
   }
}

Now you can do this:

  for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  {
     if(i.isMagic_1())
       break;
     if(i.isMagic_2())
       continue;
  }

hope this helps!

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wouldn't it be better to return true or false –  Crash893 Apr 2 '09 at 20:13
    
in fact is returning true or false. –  MRFerocius Apr 3 '09 at 1:28

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