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My ViewModel:

public class EditViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public string CurrentPassword { get; set; }

    public string NewPassword { get; set; }

    [Compare("NewPassword")]
    public string ConfirmNewPassword { get; set; }
}

I'm trying to validate CurrentPassword field. I thought about creating a Custom Validator Attribute that connect to my database(for retrieve current password) for use with DataAnnotations.

There is a better idea?

Update:

I know I can doing this validation in my controller, but I'm trying to avoid this validation logic in my controller. Just for beauty of my code/architecture.

I have not seen a better solution than create a Custom Validator for use with DataAnnotations, what do you think?

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1  
Per your edit, if you don't want to do validation in your controller, where do you want to do it? If you want to do it client side, you'd have to send the password (or some form of it) to the client... a practice I would recommend you avoid. –  Nick Larsen Jul 28 '11 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

Why not just make a call to Membership.ChangePassword? If it fails then you can add an error to the ModelState:

    [Authorize]
    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult ChangePassword(ChangePasswordModel model)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {

            // ChangePassword will throw an exception rather
            // than return false in certain failure scenarios.
            bool changePasswordSucceeded;
            try
            {
                MembershipUser currentUser = Membership.GetUser(User.Identity.Name, true /* userIsOnline */);
                changePasswordSucceeded = currentUser.ChangePassword(model.OldPassword, model.NewPassword);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                changePasswordSucceeded = false;
            }

            if (changePasswordSucceeded)
            {
                return RedirectToAction("ChangePasswordSuccess");
            }
            else
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "The current password is incorrect or the new password is invalid.");
            }
        }

        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }

This is all done in the default Internet project template by the way. Unless you are wanting client side validation I'm not sure what the purpose of checking to see if their password is correct, then calling Change Password. It would just be an extra call to the database which seems unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to avoid this validation logic in my controller. Just for beauty of my code/architecture. –  Acaz Souza Jul 28 '11 at 14:14
    
Fair enough :-) –  Dismissile Jul 28 '11 at 14:15
    
@Acaz, then refactor this solution so everything happens in a service? –  Tomas Lycken Jul 28 '11 at 14:25
    
@Tomas Yes, using Custom Validator with DataAnnotations. –  Acaz Souza Jul 28 '11 at 14:42

You can use the [Remote] Annotation.

It will make an ajax call to a method in a certain controller. There you can access the database or do some other validations.

[Remote("CheckPassword","YourController", ErrorMessage = "Wrong currentpassword")]
[Required]
public string CurrentPassword { get; set; }


public ActionResult CheckPassword(String Password)
        {
            if (YourRepository.CheckIfPassIsCorrect(Password))
            {
                return Json(false, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
            }
            else
            {
                return Json(true, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
            }
        }

Another solution

When you submit to your controller. Do something like this:

  if(!YourRepository.CheckIfPassIsCorrect(YourViewModel.CurrentPassword)
    {
    ModelState.AddModelError("CurrentPassword", "Your current password isn't correct");

//Return to your view
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use Javascript for that. I did not know about the RemoteAttribute. Great! –  Acaz Souza Jul 28 '11 at 14:08
1  
Why should the password be validated as an email address? –  Tomas Lycken Jul 28 '11 at 14:10
    
Added another solution, haha that email thingy is a typo because I copied the Remote annotation from one of my models ;) I'll edit it –  Kevin Cloet Jul 28 '11 at 14:12
    
@Kevin I'm trying to avoid this validation logic in my controller. Just for beauty of my code/architecture. –  Acaz Souza Jul 28 '11 at 14:18
    
I quess a custom Validator is the way to go then –  Kevin Cloet Jul 28 '11 at 14:20

My solution is building a Custom Validation to use with DataAnnotations, here's the code:

public class CurrentPasswordAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    AuthenticationService authenticationService = new AuthenticationService();

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        string strValue = value as string;

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(strValue))
        {
            return authenticationService.ValidateUser(HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.Name, strValue);
        }

        return false;
    }

    public override string FormatErrorMessage(string name)
    {
        return String.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, base.ErrorMessageString, name);
    }
}

And in my ViewModel:

public class EditViewModel
{
    [CurrentPassword]
    public string CurrentPassword { get; set; }

    public string NewPassword { get; set; }

    [Compare("NewPassword")]
    public string ConfirmNewPassword { get; set; }
}

Thanks.

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Whatever floats your boat - but i for one dont agree with this. Attributes should not call into services. –  RPM1984 Jul 29 '11 at 1:16
    
@RPM1984 What solution do you propose? –  Acaz Souza Jul 29 '11 at 1:24
    
IMO it belongs in the controller. Your saying you dont want to do this for the "beauty of my code/architecture". But a controllers job is to deal with the model, and update the view. It is certainly not a custom attributes job to be calling into external services. For one it makes unit-testing really difficult. Essentially @Kevin Cloet's second answer is the right one. I'm curious to know as to how does that compromise your architecture? –  RPM1984 Jul 29 '11 at 1:46
3  
So if your controllers get too "fat", then abstract the code into services. A bigger best practice than thin controllers is seperation of concerns. Attributes and services in the same class is not seperation. "Seeing if password is correct" is a domain/authentication concern, its not really validation on input, which is what attributes are for. So i would suggest putting the "fat code" in a service and make the controller call that. –  RPM1984 Jul 29 '11 at 2:15
    
@RPM1984 Yes, I agree with you, but Current Password is a field where i have only in View, not exist in Domain. Because of this, validation on input is the only place to do validation in Current Password, no? –  Acaz Souza Jul 29 '11 at 11:47

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