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I am looking at some legacy C code and got confused, it is something like:

UINT A, B = 1;
if((A = B) == 1){
   return(TRUE);
} else {
   return(FALSE);
}

We all know there will be a compiler warning if we do if(A = B), but here it looks like the 'if' is checking A against 1, am I correct?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, it assigns the value of B to A (A = B), then it checks if the result of this assignment, which is A and evaluates to 1, is equal to 1.

So technically you are correct: On the way it checks A against 1.

To make things easier to read, the code is equivalent to:

UINT A, B = 1;
A = B;
if(A == 1){
   return(TRUE);
} else {
   return(FALSE);
}
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2  
Just because you can write the code the way it has been written in the question, doesn't mean you should. You should always prefer the code as written in this answer because it has no ambiguity. –  David Heffernan Jul 28 '11 at 15:03
    
How is the original ambiguous? It was clear to you, tis clear to me. –  baash05 Jun 7 '13 at 1:04

Rather, your code is always assigning B to A, and it is moreover checking whether the value of B (and thus also A) is equal to 1.

There's nothing "legacy" about this, this is generally a pretty handy idiom if you need the result of an operation but also want to check for errors:

int result;
if ((result = foo()) != -1)
{
  printf("The result is: %i\n", result);
}
else
{
   // panic
}
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yeah your foo() check is just like those fopen() check. The code I see here is a bit more convoluted, which made me a bit confused... –  deddebme Jul 28 '11 at 14:26

If you want to keep it on 1 line:

if ((A = B), A == 1)

does the same thing.

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Correct. The value A has after the assignment will be compared to 1.

This code sample is equivalent to just :

return (TRUE);
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Exactly.I'm wondering if there would be a situation in which the assignment would fail.It makes sense if the check was for the return value of a function as Kerrek SB mentioned. –  itisravi Jul 30 '11 at 6:00
    
I expect the question is contrived to show this.. B would typically be unknown. –  baash05 Jun 7 '13 at 1:05

We are trying to avoid if statements to make code more readable.

UINT A, B = 1;
bool fResult = false;

fResult = (A == B);

return(fResult);

And if there must be an condition to act on (not) equality, see this example.

UINT A, B = 1;
bool fResult = false;

fResult = (A == B);

if(fResult)
{
  doThis();
}
else
{
  doThat();
}

return(fResult);
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