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my problem is that i have to make table which will have foreign keys, and one of three foreign keys have to be NOT NULL and rest have to be NULL. Is there anything in MySQL to solve it? Michael.

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You tagged your question database-design, so I figured I'd ask you for yours. I can't think of a proper design that would justify 2 foreign keys always being null. –  Jacob Jul 28 '11 at 14:22
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@Michal: Post details. As cularis points, your design is probably flawed. NULLs should not exist in a normalized database design (and especially in Primary and Foreign Keys). –  ypercube Jul 28 '11 at 14:27
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Nulls in primary keys NO; but there is nothing wrong with the 1 side in a FK being null... –  Mitch Wheat Jul 28 '11 at 14:28
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@Mitch: I don't disagree on that (although I prefer not have NULLs there either when possible). But "the rest (2 keys) have to be NULL" ? –  ypercube Jul 28 '11 at 14:30
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nulls in FK's are fine when they model the domain. –  Mitch Wheat Jul 28 '11 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

Avoid nullable foreign keys - they have a number of problems and disadvantages. It's generally easier and better to put those columns in separate tables so that you don't have to create nulls for them when no value exists. That ought to be the default approach: Normal Form for each distinct case unless you have some special reason to combine the three columns into one table.

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totally disagree. I see nothing wrong with having a nullable 1 side of a Foriegn Key: in fact they are common. –  Mitch Wheat Jul 28 '11 at 14:51
    
@Mitch, One disadvantage is that the constraint isn't being enforced when it appears to be. Nullable "foreign keys" are not actually foreign keys at all. They work differently in different DBMSs and software tools and so what one person or application interprets a nullable foreign key to be is different from another. They don't make much sense under any commonly applied interpretation of what "null" means. And they are completely superfluous - there's nothing represented by a nullable constraint that can't be done as well or better without. BTW Not sure what you mean by "nullable 1 side". –  sqlvogel Jul 28 '11 at 15:19

FOREIGN KEY Constraints example:

CREATE TABLE parent 
(
    id INT NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

CREATE TABLE child 
(
    id INT, parent_id INT,
    INDEX par_ind (parent_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (parent_id) REFERENCES parent(id)

) ENGINE=INNODB;
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