Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I find myself repeating a common pattern when trying to execute code across multiple objects.

Arg_list_one = ["first","second", "so on"]
Arg_list_two = ["first","second", "so on"]


MANIFEST = [ ]

class connection(object):
    def __init__(self, args):
        ...
        MANIFEST.append(self)
    def Run(self):
        ...

connection(Arg_list_one)
connection(Arg_list_two)

[conn.Run() for conn in MANIFEST]

Is this a pattern (or anti-pattern)? Or just something that I made up?

Are there other, better, ways of doing this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why would you need a list of all objects ever created? Many of those may belong to completely unrelated pieces of your application! A given piece of code shouldn't assume it's the only one to user a class. Especially since there's usually no need to:

  • A function creates a bunch of objects and then does something to all of them? Put the objects into a temporary, locally-scoped list.
  • Need to share some objects between functions? Put them in a list, pass the list to whoever should see the objects.
  • Instances of some class share some of these object? Make a list of them and put them in the class.
  • Et cetera, you see where this is going.

A more practical and less stylistic issue is that this list would keep every single object of that class that's ever instanciated alive forever. And they say one can't create memory leaks in Python... (This can be avoided with weak reference, but would make the code much more complex to transparently remove dead references.)

The solution is barely more typing and saves you a whole lot of headaches later on. Next you'll use local variables to save yourself a return?

connections = [Connection(arg_list_one), Connection(arg_list_two)]
for connection in connections:
    connection.run()

That said, there may be situations where such a list may be useful (with a fix for said memory leak, of course). I just don't see anything close to that in your example, and I think such situations are very rare.

share|improve this answer
    
Memory leak ... I prefer to call it non-deterministic expansion. Thanks for the explanation. I thought I was doing it wrong (my first hint was that I was using a global variable). –  Joseph Kern Jul 28 '11 at 16:06

I would suggest moving the manifest into the class. If it's really being used as a class variable, make it one.

class connection(object):
    MANIFEST = [ ]
    def __init__(self, args):
        ...
        self.MANIFEST.append(self)
    def Run(self):
        ...
    @classmethod
    def RunAll(cls):
        for conn in cls.MANIFEST:
            conn.Run()

connection(Arg_list_one)
connection(Arg_list_two)

conn.RunAll()

Also, if there are a lot of objects, your method will aggregate a long list of Nones (or whatever Run returns), so you're probably better off with a normal for loop.

Edit: The memory leak issue is a good point. If you do this, use the special __del__ method to remove the object from the list when it's deleted.

Edit 2: Actually, I think you'd need to do this in a close() method or something, because __del__ will never be called while there is a reference in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
I had to look up the @classmethod decorator, which is extremely useful in this example. –  Joseph Kern Jul 28 '11 at 16:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.