Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently started having problems with my projects wanting specific versions of their referenced assemblies even though the references are marked as Specific Version = False in my Visual Studio project. For example, I'll replace MyAssembly.dll version 1.0.0.0 with MyAssembly 1.0.1.0 and the applications referencing MyAssembly.dll will get an error saying version 1.0.0.0 cannot be found. The specific version property doesn't seem to be working. This is a huge pain because I have to rebuild and redeploy every application that references the assembly even if there are no breaking changes in the new version. I know in the past when this has been false it would use any version and if more than one was found it would use the latest version. Does anyone know what the problem is?

Edit: This has been open with no responses for a while. Is the question unclear? What I want to know is, is there a way to update assemblies my .NET application depends on to a new version without rebuilding my .NET application.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

Hi I just had the same problem with a Sharepoint project and I fixed it by editing the app.config file and add the following ind the configuration tag. That did the trick..

The Specific Version is a compile time issue.. I didn't know that.

  <runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
      <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity name="Microsoft.SharePoint.Dsp" publicKeyToken="71e9bce111e9429c" culture="neutral" />
        <bindingRedirect oldVersion="11.0.0.0" newVersion="14.0.0.0" />
      </dependentAssembly>
    </assemblyBinding>
  <runtime>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.