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When I want to remove a Cookie I try

unset($_COOKIE['hello']);

I see in my cookie browser from firefox that the cookie still exists. How can I really remove the cookie?

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13 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You May Try this

if (isset($_COOKIE['remember_user'])) {
            unset($_COOKIE['Hello']);
            unset($_COOKIE['HelloTest1']);
            setcookie('Hello', null, -1, '/');
            setcookie('HelloTest1', null, -1, '/');
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
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16  
I understand that this is an example, but please never ever store username or password in cookies. –  Yorirou Feb 10 at 15:56
    
i use : if (isset($_COOKIE['remember_user']) && !empty($_COOKIE['remember_user'])) { } –  devcline Mar 9 at 3:42
2  
Look down to the next answer... this one doesn't explain why any of this is necessary and 90% of it is not... –  Jasper Mar 28 at 16:58
    
It's pointless to unset($_COOKIE['Hello']);. It changes nothing if you remove it. –  machineaddict May 29 at 7:00
    
@machineaddict unset($_COOKIE['Hello']); is actually important if you might check the cookie somewhere later in the code. –  Andreas Hultgren Jun 13 at 12:08
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Set the value to "" and the expiry date to yesterday (or any date in the past)

setcookie("hello", "", time()-3600);

Then the cookie will expire the next time the page loads.

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8  
How about setting the time to 0 (the epoch)? =] –  strager Mar 27 '09 at 0:00
4  
If you put a date too far in the past, IE will bark and igores it, i.e. the value will not be removed. –  Julien Mar 27 '09 at 0:04
19  
@strager The manual states: If set to 0, or omitted, the cookie will expire at the end of the session (when the browser closes). That's not really deleting the cookie. I really don't know if IE will do what Julien said, but it's more than possible that IE will do something strange. –  Yannis May 23 '11 at 10:59
8  
Also, don't forget to actually unset($_COOKIE["hello"]) too, because if there is code on the rest of the page that looks at $_COOKIE["hello"], it will still find it set. I just got bit by this one. –  Magmatic Jul 15 '13 at 14:41
2  
Plus it's a good idea to set the path, so setcookie('hello', '', time()-3600, '/'); –  Stephan Weinhold Feb 18 at 11:35
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A clean way to delete a cookie is to clear both of $_COOKIE value and browser cookie file :

if(isset($_COOKIE['key'])) {
  unset($_COOKIE['key']);
  setcookie('key', '', time() - 3600); // empty value and old timestamp
}
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This is the best method, because you don't need to refresh page! –  MaxV Oct 17 '13 at 12:00
1  
I keep going down the page and the answers keep getting better, funny. But this is the best one, stop looking here. –  Andrew May 26 at 5:48
4  
FYI, if you set the cookie using a path, you'll need to include the path in this setcookie call as well: setcookie('key', '', time() - 3600, '/'); –  Gavin Jun 3 at 23:54
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That will unset the cookie in your code, but since the $_COOKIE variable is refreshed on each request, it'll just come back on the next page request.

To actually get rid of the cookie, set the expiration date in the past:

// set the expiration date to one hour ago
setcookie("hello", "", time()-3600);
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If you set the cookie to expire in the past, the browser will remove it. See setcookie() delete example at php.net

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To reliably delete a cookie you must not set it to expire in the past, this is because client computers can and often do have times which different from that of your server. The best practice is to overwrite the current cookie with a blank cookie which expires one second in the future, as so;

setcookie("hello", "", 1);
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3  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but setting that to "1" would set it to a second after the epoch, not one second in the future..? I believe you're correct about time zone differences though, so the best solution would be to set it to 2 days in the past (so even the furthest away time zone would still unset the cookie). –  PaulSkinner Aug 23 '13 at 10:58
    
@PaulSkinner the epoch date is independent of time zones, the computer does that computation for you. –  AlexR May 22 at 7:07
    
@AlexR Yes. Doesn't really answer my point though. To my understanding, the code above does set the cookie to expire in the past (one second past the epoch), unless I am mistaken. –  PaulSkinner May 23 at 7:34
    
@PaulSkinner of course, the rest of your comment is perfectly fine. –  AlexR May 26 at 20:51
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See the sample labelled "Example #2 setcookie() delete example" from the PHP docs. To clear a cookie from the browser, you need to tell the browser that the cookie has expired... the browser will then remove it. unset as you've used it just removes the 'hello' cookie from the COOKIE array.

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I had the same problem in my code and found that it was a cookie path issue. Check out this stack overflow post: Can't delete php set cookie

I had set the cookie using a path value of "/", but didn't have any path value when I tried to clear it, so it didn't clear. So here is an example of what worked:

Setting the cookie:

$cookiePath = "/";
$cookieExpire = time()+(60*60*24);//one day -> seconds*minutes*hours
setcookie("CookieName",$cookieValue,$cookieExpire,$cookiePath);

Clearing the cookie:

setcookie("cookieName","", time()-3600, $cookiePath);
unset ($_COOKIE['cookieName']);

Hope that helps.

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To delete cookie you just need to set the value to NULL:

"If you've set a cookie with nondefault values for an expiration time, path, or domain, you must provide those same values again when you delete the cookie for the cookie to be deleted properly." Quote from "Learning PHP5" book.

So this code should work(works for me):

Setting the cookie: setcookie('foo', 'bar', time() + 60 * 5);

Deleting the cookie: setcookie('foo', '', time() + 60 * 5);

But i noticed that everybody is setting the expiry date to past, is that necessary, and why?

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It is reliable, that's why. A combination of setting the value to nothing and a time in the past (but not too far as IE occasionally doesn't like it too far back from what I've read) works across the board. –  PaulSkinner Aug 23 '13 at 10:51
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To remove all cookies you could write:

foreach ($_COOKIE as $key => $value) {
    unset($value);
    setcookie($key, '', time() - 3600);
}
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1  
This will not actually remove the cookies unless they have the same path and domain settings as the defaults to setcookie. –  Noishe Jan 8 at 8:03
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You could set a session variable based on cookie values

session_start();

if(isset($_COOKIE['loggedin']) && ($_COOKIE['loggedin'] == "true") ){
$_SESSION['loggedin'] = "true";
}

echo ($_SESSION['loggedin'] == "true" ? "You are logged in" : "Please Login to continue");
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i know that there a long time that this topic has been created but I have seen in theses solution one little mistake (I i can call it like that, because it's a detail.). I agree, the better solution is probably this solution:

if (isset($_COOKIE['remember_user'])) {
            unset($_COOKIE['Hello']);
            unset($_COOKIE['HelloTest1']);
            setcookie('Hello', null, -1, '/');
            setcookie('HelloTest1', null, -1, '/');
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }

But, in the present case, you delet the cookies in every case where the unset fonction works and immediately you create new expired cookies in case that the unnset fonction doesn't works.

That means that even if the unset fonction works, it will still 2 cookies on the computer. The asked goal, in a logical point of view, is to delete the cookies if it is possible and if it really isn't, make it expire; to be the cleanest.

So, I think we should better do:

if (isset($_COOKIE['remember_user'])) {
            setcookie('Hello', null, -1, '/');
            setcookie('HelloTest1', null, -1, '/');
            unset($_COOKIE['Hello']);
            unset($_COOKIE['HelloTest1']);
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }

Thanks and have a nice day :)

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Function unset is meant for PHP's logic (if you want to use the variable $_COOKIE['Hello'], you can't as it is unset). And the function setcookie is meant for the navigator. 2 different purposes, the order of the functions has no impact on the actual code. –  BabyAzerty Jun 18 at 9:36
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Just set the expiration date to one hour ago, if you want to "remove" the cookie, like this:

setcookie ("TestCookie", "", time() - 3600);

or

setcookie ("TestCookie", "", time() - 3600, "/~rasmus/", "example.com", 1);

Source: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.setcookie.php

You should use the filter_input() function for all globals which a visitor can enter/manipulate, like this:

$visitors_ip = filter_input(INPUT_COOKIE, 'id');

You can read more about it here: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.filter-input.php and here: http://www.w3schools.com/php/func_filter_input.asp

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