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I don't understand what does the 'return' do in Data Encapsulation. For example, while defining the new methods:

// Program to access instance variables
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Fraction: NSObject
{
  int numerator;
  int denominator;
}

-(void) print;
-(void) setNumerator: (int) n;
-(void) setDenominator: (int) d;
-(int) numerator;
-(int) denominator;

@end

@implementation Fraction
-(void) print
{
NSLog (@"%i/%i", numerator, denominator);
}

-(void) setNumerator: (int) n
{
numerator = n;
}

-(void) setDenominator: (int) d
{
denominator = d;
}

-(int) numerator
{
return numerator;
}

-(int) denominator
{
return denominator;
}

@end

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
Fraction *myFraction = [[Fraction alloc] init];

// Set fraction to 1/3

[myFraction setNumerator: 1];
[myFraction setDenominator: 3];

// Display the fraction

NSLog (@"The value of myFraction is: %i/%i", [myFraction numerator], [myFraction denominator]);

[myFraction release];
[pool drain];

return 0;
}

Thanks in advance

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1  
Can you please post more context, e.g. a complete class definition? –  Nico Jul 28 '11 at 15:34
1  
Please try to learn how to use C, then how to use Obj-C, before asking questions. –  jtbandes Jul 28 '11 at 15:35
    
@jtbandes - why learn C first? Would you say the same to a C++ questioner? –  KevinDTimm Jul 28 '11 at 15:45
    
@KevinDTimm actually, yes. Most courses will teach the C aspects of C++ before they get into classes. You need to understand what a function does before you can refine that into class member functions. –  matthias Jul 28 '11 at 16:02
1  
@matthias - that's too bad. How do they teach java then? –  KevinDTimm Jul 28 '11 at 16:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if you have a class Fraction:

@interface Fraction{
  int _numerator;
  int _denominator;
}

-(int) numerator;
-(int) denominator;

@end


@implementation Fraction

–(int) numerator
{
return _numerator;
}

–(int) denominator
{
return _denominator;
}

//setters

@end

Then we can use this class in other classes to get the numerator / denominator of a fraction object:

//some other class
Fraction* fraction = [[Fraction alloc]init];
//set numerator / denominator
int fractionNumerator = [fraction numerator];

What we have done above is created a Fraction object and then called it's getNumerator method which returns an int. We capture this return value by assigning it to fractionNumerator.

I hope this is what you were after..

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1  
I edited the code to better follow the standard Cocoa convention. get... should only be used when you return something via a pointer in the argument; you should never put get in the standard getter. Otherwise there would be a big problem when you use KVC. –  Yuji Jul 28 '11 at 15:44

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