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What's the quickest and most efficient way of reading the last line of text from a [very, very large] file in Java?

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6 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Have a look at my answer to a similar question for C#. The code would be quite similar, although the encoding support is somewhat different in Java.

Basically it's not a terribly easy thing to do in general. As MSalter points out, UTF-8 does make it easy to spot \r or \n as the UTF-8 representation of those characters is just the same as ASCII, and those bytes won't occur in multi-byte character.

So basically, take a buffer of (say) 2K, and progressively read backwards (skip to 2K before you were before, read the next 2K) checking for a line termination. Then skip to exactly the right place in the stream, create an InputStreamReader on the top, and a BufferedReader on top of that. Then just call BufferedReader.readLine().

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UTF-8 doesn't matter - you need the last CR or LF character, which is a single byte in both ASCII and UTF-8. –  MSalters Mar 26 '09 at 15:39
    
@MSalters: Good point. Will update... –  Jon Skeet Mar 26 '09 at 15:43
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Below are two functions, one that returns the last non-blank line of a file without loading or stepping through the entire file, and the other that returns the last N lines of the file without stepping through the entire file:

What tail does is zoom straight to the last character of the file, then steps backward, character by character, recording what it sees until it finds a line break. Once it finds a line break, it breaks out of the loop. Reverses what was recorded and throws it into a string and returns. 0xA is the new line and 0xD is the carriage return.

Note: If your line endings are two characters like "CR LF", then this code will delimit on the carriage return and leave the Line feed in the content.

public String tail( File file ) {
    RandomAccessFile fileHandler = null;
    try {
        fileHandler = new RandomAccessFile( file, "r" );
        long fileLength = fileHandler.length() - 1;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        for(long filePointer = fileLength; filePointer != -1; filePointer--){
            fileHandler.seek( filePointer );
            int readByte = fileHandler.readByte();

            if( readByte == 0xA ) {
                if( filePointer == fileLength ) {
                    continue;
                }
                break;

            } else if( readByte == 0xD ) {
                if( filePointer == fileLength - 1 ) {
                    continue;
                }
                break;
            }

            sb.append( ( char ) readByte );
        }

        String lastLine = sb.reverse().toString();
        return lastLine;
    } catch( java.io.FileNotFoundException e ) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    } catch( java.io.IOException e ) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    } finally {
        if (fileHandler != null )
            try {
                fileHandler.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                /* ignore */
            }
    }
}

But you probably don't want the last line, you want the last N lines, so use this instead:

public String tail2( File file, int lines) {
    java.io.RandomAccessFile fileHandler = null;
    try {
        fileHandler = 
            new java.io.RandomAccessFile( file, "r" );
        long fileLength = fileHandler.length() - 1;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        int line = 0;

        for(long filePointer = fileLength; filePointer != -1; filePointer--){
            fileHandler.seek( filePointer );
            int readByte = fileHandler.readByte();

            if( readByte == 0xA ) {
                line = line + 1;
                if (line == lines) {
                    if (filePointer == fileLength) {
                        continue;
                    }
                    break;
                }
            } else if( readByte == 0xD ) {
                line = line + 1;
                if (line == lines) {
                    if (filePointer == fileLength - 1) {
                        continue;
                    }
                    break;
                }
            }
            sb.append( ( char ) readByte );
        }

        String lastLine = sb.reverse().toString();
        return lastLine;
    } catch( java.io.FileNotFoundException e ) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    } catch( java.io.IOException e ) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
    finally {
        if (fileHandler != null )
            try {
                fileHandler.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
            }
    }
}

Invoke the above methods like this:

File file = new File("D:\\stuff\\huge.log");
System.out.println(tail(file));
System.out.println(tail2(file, 10));

Warning In the wild west of unicode this code can cause the output of this function to come out wrong. For example "Mary?s" instead of "Mary's". Characters with hats, accents, Chinese characters etc may cause the output to be wrong because accents are added as modifiers after the character. Reversing compound characters changes the nature of the identity of the character on reversal. You will have to do full battery of tests on all languages you plan to use this with.

For more information about this unicode reversal problem read this: http://msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2009/11/02/omg-ponies-aka-humanity-epic-fail.aspx

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1  
And don't forget to close the file handler: finally { fileHandler.close(); } –  Craigo Sep 5 '12 at 4:39
    
The above does not take into account lines terminated with both CR and LF. –  Jags Mar 17 at 3:44
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Apache Commons has an implementation using RandomAccessFile.

It's called ReversedLinesFileReader.

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Using FileReader or FileInputStream won't work - you'll have to use either FileChannel or RandomAccessFile to loop through the file backwards from the end. Encodings will be a problem though, as Jon said.

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Note, RandomAccessFile's performance sucks for individual operations - so do sensible size reads into a buffer. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 26 '09 at 15:31
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In C#, you should be able to set the stream's position:

From: http://bytes.com/groups/net-c/269090-streamreader-read-last-line-text-file

using(FileStream fs = File.OpenRead("c:\\file.dat"))
{
    using(StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs))
    {
        sr.BaseStream.Position = fs.Length - 4;
        if(sr.ReadToEnd() == "DONE")
            // match
    }
}
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In Java's FileInputStream (which FileReader is based on), you cannot set the position; you can only skip forward, which probably does not read the parts you skip, but is still a one-way operation and thus not suited to looking for a linebreak at an unknown offset from the end. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 26 '09 at 15:32
    
Well...I tried :P –  rball Mar 26 '09 at 15:33
    
You can use mark() to get around that problem, depending on what the streams markLimit() is. –  James Schek Mar 26 '09 at 16:08
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You can easily change the below code to print the last line.

MemoryMappedFile for printing last 5 lines:

private static void printByMemoryMappedFile(File file) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException{
        FileInputStream fileInputStream=new FileInputStream(file);
        FileChannel channel=fileInputStream.getChannel();
        ByteBuffer buffer=channel.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, channel.size());
        buffer.position((int)channel.size());
        int count=0;
        StringBuilder builder=new StringBuilder();
        for(long i=channel.size()-1;i>=0;i--){
            char c=(char)buffer.get((int)i);
            builder.append(c);
            if(c=='\n'){
                if(count==5)break;
                count++;
                builder.reverse();
                System.out.println(builder.toString());
                builder=null;
                builder=new StringBuilder();
            }
        }
        channel.close();
    }

RandomAccessFile to print last 5 lines:

private static void printByRandomAcessFile(File file) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException{
        RandomAccessFile randomAccessFile = new RandomAccessFile(file, "r");
        int lines = 0;
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        long length = file.length();
        length--;
        randomAccessFile.seek(length);
        for(long seek = length; seek >= 0; --seek){
            randomAccessFile.seek(seek);
            char c = (char)randomAccessFile.read();
            builder.append(c);
            if(c == '\n'){
                builder = builder.reverse();
                System.out.println(builder.toString());
                lines++;
                builder = null;
                builder = new StringBuilder();
                if (lines == 5){
                    break;
                }
            }

        }
    }
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