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One can easily define a function that accepts a 1d array argument like this:

int MyFunction( const float arr[] )
{    
    // do something here, then return...

    return 1

}

Although a definition such as: int MyFunction( const float* arr ) would work as well.

How can one define a function that accepts a 2d array argument?

I know that this works: int MyFunction( const float** arr ) -- but, is it possible to use the first variation that uses []?

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float **arr is not a 2D array despite that it "looks like" one. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 17:10
    
Thanks. So how do I define a function that accepts a 2d array? –  user3262424 Jul 28 '11 at 17:12
    
    
"2d array" is an ambiguous name, it can be used to designate several different C constructs. Please show us a declaration. –  n.m. Jul 28 '11 at 17:17
    
See my answer. Note that it depends on C99. If the second dimension is a constant, you can just write the constant explicitly and then your code will work with older versions of C too. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 17:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In C99, you can provide the dimensions of the array before passing it:

 void array_function(int m, int n, float a[m][n])
 {
      for (int i = 0; i < m; i++)
          for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
              a[i][j] = 0.0;
 }


 void another_function(void)
 {
     float a1[10][20];
     float a2[15][15];
     array_function(10, 20, a1);
     array_function(15, 15, a2);
 }
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4  
By the way, the first dimension is actually unnecessary. It's ignored by the compiler. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 17:19
    
Jonathan, thank you. Given your answer, will the above prototype work for 1d array: void array_function(int n, float a[n])? –  user3262424 Jul 28 '11 at 17:34
1  
@user326424: yes, you can adapt it to a 1D array as suggested. Though how much you gain depends a bit on the comment by R.. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 28 '11 at 19:02

Try something like this:

int MyFunction(size_t ncols, const float arr[][ncols])
{    
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer should note that this is a C99-specific construct. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 28 '11 at 17:20
    
To me and many people on this site, "C" means the current version of the C standard at the time of writing, i.e. C99. But yes, noted, this does require C99. As in my comment on the original post, if ncols is a constant, you can do the same in pre-C99 C. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 17:22
    
Are you sure about the pre-C99 thing? Do you mean if ncols is const size_t, or are you talking about something else? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 28 '11 at 18:02
    
I'm talking about if ncols is an integer constant expression like 42 or sizeof(int). const-qualified variables are not constants in C. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 18:10
    
Sure, but that's something different to what you're proposing above! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 29 '11 at 0:03

The hackish way would be to pass the first element and do the array calculations manually.

This longish example uses a macro to semi-automatically extract the array dimensions to use in the call.

struct font { int disp, trig; };
struct font font3[3][3];
#define dim(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof*(x))
#define font_and_dims(x) (struct font *)x, dim(x), dim(*x)
int print(char *s, struct font *font, int dimy, int dimx) { ... }

main(){ ...   print(*av, font_and_dims(font3));   ... }

The called function accesses the array the hard way.

print(){ ...   font[row*dimx+col]   ... }

Don't be afraid to scroll down: the good stuff is at the bottom! This ugly, pedantic function at the top provides ultimate charset portability; but it is an eyesore, I admit.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int ao(int c) {
    switch(c) {
    case '0':return 0;
    case '1':return 1;
    case '2':return 2;
    case '3':return 3;
    case '4':return 4;
    case '5':return 5;
    case '6':return 6;
    case '7':return 7;
    case '8':return 8;
    case '9':return 9;
    case 'A':case 'a':return 10;
    case 'B':case 'b':return 11;
    case 'C':case 'c':return 12;
    case 'D':case 'd':return 13;
    case 'E':case 'e':return 14;
    case 'F':case 'f':return 15;
    default:return -1;
    }
}

enum {
    A = 1 << 0,
    B = 1 << 1,
    C = 1 << 2,
    D = 1 << 3,
    E = 1 << 4,
    F = 1 << 5,
    G = 1 << 6,
    H = 1 << 7 };

int seg[] = {
    /*0*/ A|B|C|D|E|F,
    /*1*/   B|C,
    /*2*/ A|B|  D|E|  G,
    /*3*/ A|B|C|D|    G,
    /*4*/   B|C|    F|G,
    /*5*/ A|  C|D|  F|G,
    /*6*/ A|  C|D|E|F|G,
    /*7*/ A|B|C,
    /*8*/ A|B|C|D|E|F|G,
    /*9*/ A|B|C|    F|G,
    /*A*/ A|B|C|D|E|  G, /*A|B|C|  E|F|G,*/
    /*b*/     C|D|E|F|G,
    /*C*/       D|E|  G, /*A|    D|E|F,*/
    /*d*/   B|C|D|E|  G,
    /*E*/ A|B|  D|E|F|G, /*A|    D|E|F|G,*/
    /*F*/ A|      E|F|G,
};

struct font {
    int disp, trig;
};
/* _
  |_|
  |_|
*/
struct font font3[3][3] = {
    { {  0,0}, {'_',A}, {  0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {'_',G}, {'|',B} },
    { {'|',E}, {'_',D}, {'|',C} },
};
/* ___
  |   |
  |___|
  |   |
  |___|
*/
struct font font5[5][5] = {
    { {  0,0}, {'_',A}, {'_',A}, {'_',A}, {  0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',B} },
    { {'|',F}, {'_',G}, {'_',G}, {'_',G}, {'|',B} },
    { {'|',E}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',C} },
    { {'|',E}, {'_',D}, {'_',D}, {'_',D}, {'|',C} }
};
/* ____
  |    |
  |    |
  |    |
  |____|
  |    |
  |    |
  |    |
  |____|
*/
struct font font9[9][7] = {
    { {  0,0}, {'_',A}, {'_',A}, {'_',A}, {'_',A}, {  0,0}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',B}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',B}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',B}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',F}, {'_',G}, {'_',G}, {'_',G}, {'_',G}, {'|',B}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',E}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',C}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',E}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',C}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',E}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {  0,0}, {'|',C}, {0,0} },
    { {'|',E}, {'_',D}, {'_',D}, {'_',D}, {'_',D}, {'|',C}, {0,0} },
};

#define dim(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof*(x))
#define font_and_dims(x) (struct font *)x, dim(x), dim(*x)

int print(char *s, struct font *font, int dimy, int dimx) {
    int row, col;
    char *sp;
    for (row = 0; row < dimy; row++) {
    for (sp = s; *sp; sp++) {
        for (col = 0; col < dimx; col++) {
            putchar( seg[ao(*sp)] & font[row*dimx+col].trig ?
                font[row*dimx+col].disp : ' ');
        }
    }
    putchar('\n');
    }
}

int main(int ac, char **av) {
    enum { F1, F2, F3 } fz = F1;
    for (++av,--ac;ac;ac--,av++) {
    if (av[0][0] == '-') {
        switch (av[0][1]) {
            case '1': fz=F1; continue;
            case '2': fz=F2; continue;
            case '3': fz=F3; continue;
            default: fprintf(stderr, "Unrecognized Option!\n");
        }
    }
    if (strspn(*av, "0123456789abcdefABCDEF") != strlen(*av))
        fprintf(stderr, "Hex only!\n");
    else
        switch(fz) {
            case F1: print(*av, font_and_dims(font3)); break;
            case F2: print(*av, font_and_dims(font5)); break;
            case F3: print(*av, font_and_dims(font9)); break;
            default: fprintf(stderr, "Invalid Font!\n");
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
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In C89 u can use

typedef float OneRow[2];

void func(OneRow *arr)
{
  printf("%f",arr[1][0]);
}
...
  OneRow arr[] = {{1,2},{3,4},{5,6}};
  func(arr);
...
share|improve this answer

One option is you can have a struct something like this:

typedef struct Array2d_t
{

  void** pArray;
  size_t nRows;
  size_t nCols;

} Array2d;

Then in the function you can pass the pointer of Array2D:

int YourFunction( Array2D* const pArray2D ) {}

This is how GLib GArray is also done.

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Same as void MyFunction(int **arr, int m, int n), you can try this

void MyFunction(int *arr[], int m, int n)
{
   //...
}

Also here is one good link

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