Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I generate random floats in C++?

I thought I could take the integer rand and divide it by something, would that be adequate enough?

share|improve this question
1  
It depends rather what you want the number for, and how random. typically rand() will give 15 bits of randomness, but floats have 23 bit precision, so it will miss some values out. –  Pete Kirkham Mar 26 '09 at 16:11
    
My answer on this question could be of any use to you: stackoverflow.com/questions/9912143/… –  Dudeson Jul 6 '13 at 16:27
    
I have updated my answer to include all the major options available and my choice to focus on random header added in C++11 is further bolstered by the standard document N3924: Discouraging rand() in C++14. I include rand() in my answer for mostly historical considerations but also realizing legacy application do exist. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jun 17 at 14:12
add comment

12 Answers

up vote 182 down vote accepted

rand() can be used to generate psudo-random numbers in C++. In combination with RAND_MAX and a little math, you can generate random numbers in any arbitrary interval you choose. This is sufficient for learning purposes and toy programs. If you need truly random numbers with normal distribution, you'll need to employ a more advanced method.


This will generate a number from 0.0 to 1.0, inclusive.

float r = static_cast <float> (rand()) / static_cast <float> (RAND_MAX);

This will generate a number from 0.0 to some arbitrary float, X:

float r2 = static_cast <float> (rand()) / (static_cast <float> (RAND_MAX/X));

This will generate a number from some arbitrary LO to some arbitrary HI:

float r3 = LO + static_cast <float> (rand()) /( static_cast <float> (RAND_MAX/(HI-LO)));

Note that the rand() function will often not be sufficient if you need truly random numbers.


Before calling rand(), you must first "seed" the random number generator by calling srand(). This should be done once during your program's run -- not once every time you call rand(). This is often done like this:

srand (static_cast <unsigned> (time(0)));

In order to call rand or srand you must #include <cstdlib>.

In order to call time, you must #include <ctime>.

share|improve this answer
8  
Don't forget to seed first! –  Klaim Mar 26 '09 at 16:18
7  
Best to note that the both limits are inclusive. –  dmckee Mar 26 '09 at 16:52
1  
This is C++, so you'd rather use <ctime> instead. –  0x499602D2 Oct 26 '12 at 14:27
3  
What is the reason for choosing to divide from the denominator instead of multiply by the result of the division? –  NickLarsen Dec 9 '12 at 1:02
3  
This answer is misleading. It was covered at Going Native 2013 last week; rand() Considered Harmful, channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/2013/… for a very detailed explanation. –  Ade Miller Sep 8 '13 at 0:13
show 15 more comments

Take a look at Boost.Random. You could do something like this:

float gen_random_float(float min, float max)
{
    boost::mt19937 rng;
    boost::uniform_real<float> u(min, max);
    boost::variate_generator<boost::mt19937&, boost::uniform_real<float> > gen(rng, u);
    return gen();
}

Play around, you might do better passing the same mt19937 object around instead of constructing a new one every time, but hopefully you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
uniform_real uses a half-open interval [min, max), which means you will get your minimum value but will never reach the maximum value. It's something to consider, although if you round in some way, you can get over this problem. –  Wolf Jun 17 '11 at 17:09
8  
This is now part of C++11. –  TomA Nov 26 '11 at 20:23
add comment

call the code with two float values,the code works in any range.

float rand_FloatRange(float a, float b)
{
return ((b-a)*((float)rand()/RAND_MAX))+a;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you are using C++ and not C, then remember that in technical report 1 (TR1) and in the C++0x draft they have added facilities for a random number generator in the header file, I believe it is identical to the Boost.Random library and definitely more flexible and "modern" than the C library function, rand.

This syntax offers the ability to choose a generator (like the mersenne twister mt19937) and then choose a distribution (normal, bernoulli, binomial etc.).

Syntax is as follows (shameless borrowed from this site):

  #include <iostream>
  #include <random>

  ...

  std::tr1::mt19937 eng;  // a core engine class 
  std::tr1::normal_distribution<float> dist;     

  for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)        
      std::cout << dist(eng) << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
add comment

C++11 gives you a lot of new options with random.

To see why using rand() can be problematic see the rand() Considered Harmful presentation material by Stephan T. Lavavej given during the GoingNative 2013 event. The slides are in the comments but here is a direct link.

The example below is distilled from the above document and uses the std::mersenne_twister_engine engine and the std::uniform_real_distribution which generates numbers in the [0,10) interval, with other engines and distributions commented out (see it live):

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;

    //
    // Engines 
    //
    std::mt19937 e2(rd());
    //std::knuth_b e2(rd());
    //std::default_random_engine e2(rd()) ;

    //
    // Distribtuions
    //
    std::uniform_real_distribution<> dist(0, 10);
    //std::normal_distribution<> dist(2, 2);
    //std::student_t_distribution<> dist(5);
    //std::poisson_distribution<> dist(2);
    //std::extreme_value_distribution<> dist(0,2);

    std::map<int, int> hist;
    for (int n = 0; n < 10000; ++n) {
        ++hist[std::floor(dist(e2))];
    }

    for (auto p : hist) {
        std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1) << std::setw(2)
                  << p.first << ' ' << std::string(p.second/200, '*') << '\n';
    }
}

output will be similar to the following:

0 ****
1 ****
2 ****
3 ****
4 *****
5 ****
6 *****
7 ****
8 *****
9 ****

The output will vary depending on which distribution you choose, so if we decided to go with std::normal_distribution<> dist(2, 2); instead of std::uniform_real_distribution<> dist(0, 10); the output would be similar to this:

-6 
-5 
-4 
-3 
-2 **
-1 ****
 0 *******
 1 *********
 2 *********
 3 *******
 4 ****
 5 **
 6 
 7 
 8 
 9 

Boost

Of course Boost.Random is always an option as well, here I am using boost::random::uniform_real_distribution:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_real_distribution.hpp>

int main()
{
    boost::random::mt19937 gen;
    boost::random::uniform_real_distribution<> dist(0, 10);

    std::map<int, int> hist;
    for (int n = 0; n < 10000; ++n) {
        ++hist[std::floor(dist(gen))];
    }

    for (auto p : hist) {
        std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1) << std::setw(2)
                  << p.first << ' ' << std::string(p.second/200, '*') << '\n';
    }
}

rand()

If you must use rand() then we can go to the C FAQ for a guides on How can I generate floating-point random numbers? , which basically gives an example similar to this for generating an on the interval [0,1):

#include <stdlib.h>

double randZeroToOne()
{
    return rand() / (RAND_MAX + 1.);
}

and to generate a random number in the range from [M,N):

double randMToN(double M, double N)
{
    return M + (rand() / ( RAND_MAX / (N-M) ) ) ;  
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for clarifying , now I understand, but where is my comment? –  Muhammad Annaqeeb Jun 18 at 7:12
add comment

On some systems (Windows with VC springs to mind, currently), RAND_MAX is ridiculously small, i. e. only 15 bit. When dividing by RAND_MAX you are only generating a mantissa of 15 bit instead of the 23 possible bits. This may or may not be a problem for you, but you're missing out some values in that case.

Oh, just noticed that there was already a comment for that problem. Anyway, here's some code that might solve this for you:

float r = (float)((rand() << 15 + rand()) & ((1 << 24) - 1)) / (1 << 24);

Untested, but might work :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like a nice solution. –  Trap Mar 26 '09 at 17:36
    
What about float r = (float)((rand() << 9) | rand()) / RAND_MAX? (also untested) –  Trap Mar 26 '09 at 17:44
    
Argh, sorry, dividing by RAND_MAX won't take you anywhere ... the whole point of this trick was to have something that's larger than RAND_MAX ... fixed that for me as well. –  Јοеу Mar 27 '09 at 8:07
1  
Be careful about composing random numbers without theory... consecutive calls to rand() might not be completely independent. Hint: if its a linear congruential generator, watch the low bit on consecutive calls: it alternates between 0 and 1. –  RBerteig Mar 27 '09 at 8:14
    
I know. For some applications this might be enough, though. But yes, you should probably use more than just two calls in this case. There is no silver bullet in this case, you can't even rely on it being an LCG. Other PRNGs have weak high bits. The Boost solution should be the best here. –  Јοеу Mar 27 '09 at 8:46
show 1 more comment

In my opinion the above answer do give some 'random' float, but none of them is truly a random float (i.e. they miss a part of the float representation). Before I will rush into my implementation lets first have a look at the ANSI/IEEE standard format for floats:

|sign (1-bit)| e (8-bits) | f (23-bit) |

the number represented by this word is (-1 * sign) * 2^e * 1.f

note the the 'e' number is a biased (with a bias of 127) number thus ranging from -127 to 126. The most simple (and actually most random) function is to just write the data of a random int into a float, thus

int tmp = rand();
float f = (float)*((float*)&tmp);

note that if you do float f = (float)rand(); it will convert the integer into a float (thus 10 will become 10.0).

So now if you want to limit the maximum value you can do something like (not sure if this works)

int tmp = rand();
float f = *((float*)&tmp);
tmp = (unsigned int)f       // note float to int conversion!
tmp %= max_number;
f -= tmp;

but if you look at the structure of the float you can see that the maximum value of a float is (approx) 2^127 which is way larger as the maximum value of an int (2^32) thus ruling out a significant part of the numbers that can be represented by a float. This is my final implementation:

/**
 * Function generates a random float using the upper_bound float to determine 
 * the upper bound for the exponent and for the fractional part.
 * @param min_exp sets the minimum number (closest to 0) to 1 * e^min_exp (min -127)
 * @param max_exp sets the maximum number to 2 * e^max_exp (max 126)
 * @param sign_flag if sign_flag = 0 the random number is always positive, if 
 *              sign_flag = 1 then the sign bit is random as well
 * @return a random float
 */
float randf(int min_exp, int max_exp, char sign_flag) {
    assert(min_exp <= max_exp);

    int min_exp_mod = min_exp + 126;

    int sign_mod = sign_flag + 1;
    int frac_mod = (1 << 23);

    int s = rand() % sign_mod;  // note x % 1 = 0
    int e = (rand() % max_exp) + min_exp_mod;
    int f = rand() % frac_mod;

    int tmp = (s << 31) | (e << 23) | f;

    float r = (float)*((float*)(&tmp));

    /** uncomment if you want to see the structure of the float. */
//    printf("%x, %x, %x, %x, %f\n", (s << 31), (e << 23), f, tmp, r);

    return r;
}

using this function randf(0, 8, 0) will return a random number between 0.0 and 255.0

share|improve this answer
    
you have a mistake. rand() % frac_mod willnot work since MAX_RAND is usually lower than (1<<23). –  DanielHsH Jul 10 '13 at 8:45
    
I have to admit that I don't know the exact size of MAX_RAND. Never the less it will still work, its maybe a useless statement, but it will still work. 8 % 10 = 8 so thats fine, but if MAX_RAND is always smaller then (1 << 23) you can indeed remove it. –  user2546926 Jul 16 '13 at 19:34
    
No, You are a bit wrong. RandMax is typically ~65,000. That means that from 23 bits you make only 15 random. The others will be probably zero. You will indeed get random numbers but of low precision. For example your random generator can generate 0.001 and 0.002 but cannot generate 0.0017. So you have a uniform distribution but of low precision (256 times less precision than the float). –  DanielHsH Jul 17 '13 at 7:37
add comment

drand48(3) is the POSIX standard way. GLibC also provides a reentrant version, drand48_r(3).

The function was declared obsolete in SVID 3 but no adequate alternative was provided so IEEE Std 1003.1-2013 still includes it and has no notes that it's going anywhere anytime soon.

In Windows, the standard way is CryptGenRandom().

share|improve this answer
add comment

rand() return a int between 0 and RAND_MAX. To get a random number between 0.0 and 1.0, first cast the int return by rand() to a float, then divide by RAND_MAX.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I wasn't satisfied by any of the answers so far so I wrote a new random float function. It makes bitwise assumptions about the float data type. It still needs a rand() function with at least 15 random bits.

//Returns a random number in the range [0.0f, 1.0f).  Every
//bit of the mantissa is randomized.
float rnd(void){
  //Generate a random number in the range [0.5f, 1.0f).
  unsigned int ret = 0x3F000000 | (0x7FFFFF & ((rand() << 8) ^ rand()));
  unsigned short coinFlips;

  //If the coin is tails, return the number, otherwise
  //divide the random number by two by decrementing the
  //exponent and keep going. The exponent starts at 63.
  //Each loop represents 15 random bits, a.k.a. 'coin flips'.
  #define RND_INNER_LOOP() \
    if( coinFlips & 1 ) break; \
    coinFlips >>= 1; \
    ret -= 0x800000
  for(;;){
    coinFlips = rand();
    RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP();
    //At this point, the exponent is 60, 45, 30, 15, or 0.
    //If the exponent is 0, then the number equals 0.0f.
    if( ! (ret & 0x3F800000) ) return 0.0f;
    RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP();
    RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP();
    RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP();
    RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP(); RND_INNER_LOOP();
  }
  return *((float *)(&ret));
}
share|improve this answer
3  
interesting approach, I'd like to upvote but, I really don't understand what's going on –  hasenj Dec 5 '09 at 3:56
add comment

For C++, it can generate real float numbers within the range specified by dist variable

  #include <random>  //If it doesnt work then use   #include <tr1/random>
  #include <iostream>

  using namespace std;

  typedef std::tr1::ranlux64_base_01 Myeng; 
  typedef std::tr1::normal_distribution<double> Mydist;


int main()   { 

       Myeng eng; 
       eng.seed((unsigned int) time(NULL)); //initializing generator to January 1, 1970);
       Mydist dist(1,10); 

       dist.reset(); // discard any cached values 
       for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
      {
           std::cout << "a random value == " << (int)dist(eng) << std::endl; 
       }

  return (0);   }
share|improve this answer
    
Did you just copy and paste the code from this answer? stackoverflow.com/a/1118739/1538531 –  Derek Nov 13 '13 at 17:39
    
Actually No. I am bit surprised to see how much they look alike! But I did initialize engine-generator Jan 1,1970. –  Marco167 Nov 14 '13 at 14:35
    
Fair enough. I did notice that you initialized the generator to the epoch, but darn that code is similar! –  Derek Nov 14 '13 at 15:11
add comment

Completely random valid float number is generated in the following way: Random sign, random exponent and random mantissa. Here is an example of generating random numbers from 0..MAXFLOAT with uniform distribution:

static float frand(){
    float f;
    UINT32 *fi = (UINT32*)&f;
    *fi = 0;
    const int minBitsRandGives  = (1<<15);          //  RAND_MAX is at least (1<<15)    
    UINT32 randExp              = (rand()%254)+1;   //  Esponents are in range of [1..254]
    UINT32 randMantissa         = ((rand() % minBitsRandGives) << 8) | (rand()%256);
    *fi                         = randMantissa | (randExp<<23);                 // Build a float with random exponent and random mantissa
    return f;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

protected by Makoto Dec 18 '13 at 2:52

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.