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Currently I have some code deleting some temporary files created by my program:

# Delete the generated files
exts = [".lsys", ".py", ".pyc"]
for ext in exts:
    os.remove("{0}{1}{2}".format(self.grammarDir, filename, ext))

Now I'm trying to port the application to Mac. Looking at the documentation for Python 2.7, it specifically says:

Remove (delete) the file path. If path is a directory, OSError is raised; see rmdir() below to remove a directory. This is identical to the unlink() function documented below. On Windows, attempting to remove a file that is in use causes an exception to be raised; on Unix, the directory entry is removed but the storage allocated to the file is not made available until the original file is no longer in use.

Availability: Unix, Windows.

Is there an equivalent to os.remove() for Mac or am I stuck using something like this?

os.system("rm {0}{1}{2}".format(self.grammarDir, filename, ext))

I need compatibility with Mac, and maintaining compatibility with Ubuntu would be a huge bonus (but isn't strictly necessary).

Edit:

Well, now I feel foolish. Turns out I had a broken call above this segment of code so the deletion code wasn't being reached. Misdiagnosed where my error was, thought it was failing silently.

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3  
Mac OS is an Unix. os.remove should work. –  utdemir Jul 28 '11 at 18:49
1  
Modern (OSX) macs are basically unix, so I'd naturally assume it's available under mac as well. Did you try it and it didn't work; or do you mean pre-OSX mac? –  delnan Jul 28 '11 at 18:50
    
Have you tried this? OS X is based somewhat on Linux. –  FishBasketGordo Jul 28 '11 at 18:51
    
Assuming you have to support only Mac OS X, os.remove should work perfectly fine, since Mac OS X is a Unix variant. –  Frank Schmitt Jul 28 '11 at 18:52
    
os.remove should be cross-platform. –  MRAB Jul 28 '11 at 18:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Mac OS X is a Unix, too. From the top of the linked documentation:

If not separately noted, all functions that claim “Availability: Unix” are supported on Mac OS X, which builds on a Unix core.

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1  
And I completely missed that. Turns out I had a broken call above this segment of code so the deletion code wasn't being reached. Misdiagnosed my error, thought it was failing silently. –  thegrinner Jul 28 '11 at 18:57

Unix in this context means Mac and Linux, too. Problably all Unix-like/POSIX-compliant systems that you can build Python on.

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1  
Who on earth down-voted this?! +1 to compensate! –  David Heffernan Jul 28 '11 at 18:53

os.remove is available on Windows and Unix. Max OSX counts as Unix so you can use os.remove on Mac OSX.

From the documentation that you linked to:

If not separately noted, all functions that claim “Availability: Unix” are supported on Mac OS X, which builds on a Unix core.

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