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I have a code which I need to use within eval. Sometimes I need to get out from the eval code, but my tries lead to errors.

E.g.:

# expected to see 1, 2 and 5; not 3 nor 4; and no errors
eval "puts 1; puts 2; return; puts 3; puts 4"   # => Error: unexpected return
puts 5

I tried with return, end, exit, break, and I couldn't get success. exit doesn't raise errors, but then I don't get the 5.

(Note: I know that eval is evil, but in this case I need to use it.)

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I discovered something weird. break jumps out from an yielded block. So, I can do: def do_yield; yield; end; do_yield { eval "puts 1; puts 2; break; puts 3" }; puts 5 and I get the expected result. I don't know why that works! –  Sony Santos Jul 28 '11 at 20:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Thank you all, but I found a solution which fits best into my problem:

lambda do
  eval "puts 1; puts 2; return; puts 3; puts 4"
end.call
puts 5

This way the intuitive return keyword can be used inside eval to get out from it successfully.

I didn't like the conditional-like solutions in this case because it would force me (or the user) to add an end at the end.

About using throw/catch or break, I consider the return keyword more intuitive.

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eval'd code is just being run in this place. It's not a function or block. How would you do it without eval? Probably like this:

puts 1
puts 2 
if(conditionFor3And4) 
  puts 3 
  puts 4
end
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you Can't. You can return out of methods, and break out of blocks or loops, but not eval.

You could try a throw/catch block instead

eval " 
  should_stop = true
  catch :stop do
    puts 1  
    puts 2 
    throw :stop if should_stop
    puts 3
  end
"

or this:

  should_stop = true
  catch :stop do
  eval " 
    puts 1  
    puts 2 
    throw :stop if should_stop
    puts 3
 "
 end

or just do a conditional like Mchl said, since you probably want it to conditional stop, not just always, but throw catch will let you jump out of a block no matter how many levels down you are, which make it more robust, if you need to break out of a nested loop or something like that.

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1  
Awesome answer! This way I can put catch :stop do ... end around eval and use only the throw inside it! Before your answer, I was thinking about using Continuation, but catch/throw is by far better because it doesn't involve cc global variables, only symbols. –  Sony Santos Jul 28 '11 at 19:59
    
I Didn't realize that but that's cool, you can put them out side of eval block. Whoa. –  loosecannon Jul 28 '11 at 20:03

You could just use conditionals instead of early returns.

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