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I have the following c function declaration:

float Sum2d( const unsigned int nRows, const unsigned int mCols, float arr[nRows][mCols] )
{
    float sumAll = 0;

    // I would like to make this change illegal! 
    arr[0][0] = 15;

    for (int i = 0; i < nRows; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < mCols; j++)
            sumAll += arr[i][j];

    return sumAll;
}

Using the code:

int main()
{
    // define a 2d float array
    float myArr2d[3][2] = {{1,2}, {3,4}, {5,6}};

    // calculate the sum
    float sum = Sum2d(3, 2, myArr2d);

    // print the sum
    printf("%f\n", myOpResult);

    // return 1
    return 1;
}

This function works well, yet there's one problem: the elements of arr can be altered in the Sum2d() function.

How can I change Sum2d()'s prototype to prevent any changes to arr's elements?

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1  
Declaring the argument const (which does not finitely prevent you from altering it but "makes it harder") float Sum2d( const unsigned int nRows, const unsigned int mCols, const float arr[nRows][mCols] ) –  Nobody Jul 28 '11 at 19:21
    
Nobody: when I use the prototype you suggested, I get the following error: file.c:71: warning: passing argument 3 of ‘Sum2d’ from incompatible pointer type file.c:38: note: expected ‘const float (*)[(unsigned int)mCols]’ but argument is of type ‘float (*)[2]’ –  user3262424 Jul 28 '11 at 19:44
    
I am using the gnu compiler (Ubuntu Linux) in c99 mode –  user3262424 Jul 28 '11 at 19:44
3  
@Nobody: Sorry, you're wrong. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 20:20
3  
@hexa: VLA is rather useless as an automatic variable type, but it's extremely useful in the form of pointer-to-VLA types. It allows you to get the compiler to do all the ugly multi-dimensional array indexing arithmetic for you when passing around pointers. And of course if the function can be inlined and the array size is constant, the mults will get optimized out. –  R.. Jul 28 '11 at 21:03

3 Answers 3

Multidimensional arrays with const qualification are difficult to handle. Basically you have the choice to cast non-const arrays at every call side, to avoid such const arrays as arguments completely, or to deviate by using some sophisticated macros. This is a longer story, you may read it up here.

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I don't know what compiler you're using, but that doesn't compile for me as C or C++.

But regardless, just making arr const should suffice.

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Change the prototype of the function to use const with float

Also you have specified nRows / nCols in array argument, which is not allowed in C. If you don't know the bounds of array, use double pointer.

This approach doesn't prevents typecasting in the function.

#include <stdio.h>

float Sum2d( const unsigned int nRows, const unsigned int mCols, const float arr[][2] )
{
    float sumAll = 0;

    // I would like to make this change illegal! 
    //arr[0][0] = 15;

    for (int i = 0; i < nRows; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < mCols; j++)
            sumAll += arr[i][j];

    return sumAll;
}

int main()
{
    // define a 2d float array
    float myArr2d[3][2] = {{1,2}, {3,4}, {5,6}};

    // calculate the sum
    float sum = Sum2d(3, 2, (const float (*)[2])myArr2d);

    // print the sum
    printf("%f\n", sum);

    // return 1
    return 1;
}

Since you are using following command line i suppose:

gcc <file.c> -o out -std=c99

Running on Debian Squeeze
$ gcc array.c -o array -std=c99

$ gcc --version       
gcc (Debian 4.4.5-8) 4.4.5
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO   
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.             
share|improve this answer
    
ASD: thank you. When I use the prototype you suggested, I get the following error: file.c:71: warning: passing argument 3 of ‘Sum2d’ from incompatible pointer type file.c:38: note: expected ‘const float ()[(unsigned int)mCols]’ but argument is of type ‘float ()[2]’ –  user3262424 Jul 28 '11 at 19:51
    
@user3262424 - are you sure? I just tried the code and it behaves as ASD is suggesting. –  celavek Jul 28 '11 at 19:55
3  
that's wrong too. "Also you have specified nRows / nCols in array argument, which is not allowed in C." is wrong (it's allowed). Also, const float(*)[2] is not a pointer to a const qualified type. You cannot initialize it by a float(*)[2], because you will try to initialize a X* by a Y*, and X and Y are unrelated in your case (const float[2] vs float[2]). It's not like in C++ where that will work. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 28 '11 at 19:59
    
I think you need to revise how to pass array as arguments to a function. –  ASD Jul 28 '11 at 20:00
1  
"use double pointer" this is one of the urban myth which result in so many complicated and error prone code. C knows very well how to handle multi-dimensional arrays and whenever you may, you should use them. –  Jens Gustedt Jul 28 '11 at 20:56

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