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I am creating stored procedures for inserting and updating data in my SQL Server database. At first I was creating a separate procedure for Add/Set but then I stumbled across a query that allows me to condense them into a single procedure. I wanted to check with the SO community on any possible future issues doing it this way.

Separate Procedures

--INSERT Procedure
CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[AddDataType]
    @TypeName [nvarchar](255),
    @TypeProperty [nvarchar](255)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    INSERT INTO DataType(TypeName, TypeProperty)
    VALUES(@TypeName, @TypeProperty)

    SELECT SCOPE_IDENTITY()
END

--UPDATE Procedure
CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[SetDataType]
    @ID [int],
    @TypeName [nvarchar](255),
    @TypeProperty [nvarchar](255)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    UPDATE DataType SET TypeName = @TypeName, TypeProperty = @TypeProperty
    WHERE ID = @ID
 END

EXEC AddDataType @TypeName = 'Test Name', @TypeProperty = 'Test Property' --INSERT
EXEC SetDataType @ID = 42, @TypeName = 'Test Name', @TestProperty = 'Test Property' --UPDATE

Combined

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[SetDataType]
    @ID [int] = NULL,
    @TypeName [nvarchar](255),
    @TypeProperty [nvarchar](255)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    UPDATE DataType SET TypeName = @TypeName, TypeProperty = @TypeProperty
    WHERE ID = @ID

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
        INSERT INTO DataType(TypeName, TypeProperty)
        VALUES(@TypeName, @TypeProperty)

    IF @ID IS NULL
        SELECT SCOPE_IDENTITY()
END

EXEC SetDataType @TypeName = 'New Type Name', @TypeProperty = 'New Type Property' --INSERT
EXEC SetDataType @ID = 42, @TypeName = 'Updated Type Name', @TypeProperty = 'Updated Type Property' --UPDATE

So far I have 15 type tables that I creating procedures for and am trying to cut down on the number of procedures created, however I don't want to sacrifice performance. I know the second method is more processing, but would it be significant enough to cause issues? I don't see the type tables holding mass amounts of data, no more than 100 records with the average being around 10-20.

Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I personally prefer having separate, focused procedures - I don't like those "do-it-all-and-then-some-more" methods that do all sorts of things - all depending on what values you pass in.... –  marc_s Jul 28 '11 at 19:48
    
@marc_s I'm okay with those for search procedures, where much of the logic is unchanged even for a wide variety of parameters (DRY). Until MERGE (and except in cases where, say, the app might not know if this item is new or existing), for DML I generally agree with you. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 28 '11 at 19:56
    
You'll be scanning when you're trying to update if it doesn't exist. The question is really, do you want to have good SQL performance or less procs? –  Dan Andrews Jul 28 '11 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What version of SQL Server? This information is always useful so please get in the habit of tagging your question with the specific version.

If or greater, you should consider MERGE instead of separate INSERT/UPDATE operations.

EDIT updated with MERGE sample.

USE tempdb;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.DataType
(
    ID INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
    TypeName NVARCHAR(255),
    [TypeProperty] NVARCHAR(255)
);

INSERT dbo.DataType(TypeName, [TypeProperty]) 
    SELECT N'name 1', N'property 1';
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.MergeDataType
    @ID INT = NULL,
    @TypeName NVARCHAR(255),
    @TypeProperty NVARCHAR(255)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    WITH [source](ID, TypeName, [TypeProperty]) AS 
    (
        SELECT @ID, @TypeName, @TypeProperty
    )
    MERGE dbo.DataType AS [target] USING [source]
    ON [target].ID = [source].ID
    WHEN MATCHED THEN
        UPDATE SET [target].TypeName = @TypeName,
            [target].[TypeProperty] = @TypeProperty
    WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
        INSERT (TypeName, [TypeProperty]) 
            VALUES(@TypeName, @TypeProperty);
END
GO

EXEC dbo.MergeDataType 
    @TypeName = N'foo', 
    @TypeProperty = N'bar';

EXEC dbo.MergeDataType 
    @ID = 1, 
    @TypeName = N'name 1', 
    @TypeProperty = N'new property';
GO

SELECT ID, TypeName, [TypeProperty] FROM dbo.DataType;
GO

DROP TABLE dbo.DataType;
DROP PROCEDURE dbo.MergeDataType;
GO

(Latest edit was to add N prefix - if these columns can support Unicode, always use N prefix; if they don't need to, then change them to varchar.)

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry re-tagged. It is 08, I was unaware of the MERGE function. I will give that a shot. Thank You –  jon3laze Jul 28 '11 at 19:46
2  
If MERGE doesn't work out for you for whatever reason, then I'd advocate the separate procedure path - especially if the app knows up front whether this is add or edit, and especially if the stored procedure(s) may get more complex later (and therefore will benefit from separate compiled plans). –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 28 '11 at 19:49
    
So far everything I am finding on the MERGE function is referencing merging data (INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE) between two tables. In my case it's going to be a direct call to a single table. Basically I want INSERT/UPDATE based on whether it exists or not. Could you provide an example of this using MERGE or should I just stick to the separate procedures? –  jon3laze Jul 28 '11 at 19:56
2  
"two tables" don't necessarily need to be actual physical tables. They just need to smell like it. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 28 '11 at 20:09
    
Works perfectly, thank you for the assistance. –  jon3laze Jul 28 '11 at 20:18

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