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I am trying to set up try/catch/finally to behave like if/else. I am not sure of the most elegant way to do this simple thing.

public bool login()
{
bool isLoggedIn = false;
if (connectToServer(Path,username,password) ) // if successful
  {
     isLoggedIn = true;
  }
  else
  {

  }

return isLoggedIn;
}

Here is what I attempted with Exceptions.

public bool login()
{
 bool isLoggedIn = false;

 try{
    connectToServer(Path,username,password)
    isLoggedIn = true; 
  }
  catch(myConnectionException ex)
  {


  }

return isLoggedIn;
}

the 2nd line "isLoggedIn" is going to get executed although the previous line raises an exception upon failure. My thinking is to ask "if an exception was thrown, I don't want that line to be executed. Can I (should I) access the exception object at this point to test? (or is it out of scope?) I am a former C coder so I am trying to "keep it c#" to do a simple thing. I just want to perfect my skills and be in line with "best practices". Thanks DTM

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5  
If you want try/catch to work like if/else, you're approaching it wrong. Don't use exceptions for control flow. –  Anthony Pegram Jul 28 '11 at 20:13
    
I thank you all for your ideas and approaches. I now have a good chunk to work with. –  Mark Irvin Aug 1 '11 at 15:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No it won't get executed. However, this is bad practice as there is a costly context-switch to handle the exception. You should only use exceptions in exceptional cases.

I would consider combining the two approaches.

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+1 for the last sentence. –  John Jul 28 '11 at 20:13
    
+1 for the whole answer. You don't use exceptions for controlling flow. –  aepheus Jul 28 '11 at 20:20

What would be wrong with doing something like this?

bool isLoggedIn = false;

try
{
    isLoggedIn = connectToServer(Path, username, password);
}
catch (ExceptionType1 ex1)
{
    //Recover from this exception type.
}
catch (ExceptionType2 ex2)
{
    //Recover from this exception type.
}

Exceptions aren't a "replacement" for if statements. They're for handling error conditions, if one should occur, and using them to control the flow of an application is certainly not advisable. At the very least they're slow, and using them to control flow may hide actual real errors from you when you may actually want the application to fail.

EDIT: As @Anthony Pegram mentions in the comment below, dealing with all exception types in a single catch block is bad practice (something I'm guilty of all too often), since it also hides exceptions from you that you might actually want to handle specifically.

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1  
I would object to your catch portion in the code snippet. It certainly is not likely your intention, as the text of your answer implies against it, but your phrasing in the code is harmful. Instead, you should encourage catching narrowly defined exceptions that can be dealt with, not any possible error, as those should simply bubble right on up. –  Anthony Pegram Jul 28 '11 at 20:21
1  
@Anthony - You're right, it wasn't my intention, but you make a good point so I've clarified my answer. –  Karl Nicoll Jul 28 '11 at 20:23

connectToServer should throw a myConnectionException if it wasn't successful

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I would highly recommend moving the try/catch block to connectToServer. You should never control program flow with exceptions, as mentioned the context switch is horrible overhead.

Have connectToServer always return true or false (have it internally catch it's errors and return false). and simply:

return connectToServer(Path,username,password);
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... but I would catch possible exceptions if the following code would produce not expected or unwanted results caused by this exception. (Ok, could be catched in a place someone else... but should be catched.) –  Beachwalker Jul 28 '11 at 20:27
    
In my opinion it is better to more generically handle errors, and rather use detection and validation to prevent errors. Far too often I see try/catch used instead of detection and validation. People don't even understand the code they are calling and just wrap it in a try catch block... –  aepheus Jul 28 '11 at 20:58
    
For example, in this case, connectToServer should be responsible for all the data access concerns (including errors), and simply return true or false. It should be up to login to validate the parameters for connectToServer and assure that that the parameters are what is expected. –  aepheus Jul 28 '11 at 21:01

In this simple example the

isLoggedIn = true;

is not reached if an exception is thrown so it is still false (as initialized) if the connection call throws an exception. Even if it is not a catched exception type the part of setting isLoggin to true will never be reached.

As mentioned before: Don't use exception instead of if/then/else or switch/case. If your code has more method calls after setting the isLoggedIn to true then you should reset this to false because in the catch because this will be the returned result.

By the way, there is no difference in the rule of using exceptions in c# or i c++. This seems common to both languages.

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This will work, but should not be done. Your best bet would be to code it as :

public bool login()
{
    return connectToServer(Path,username,password);
}

Short and sweet. Exceptions are very bad to use except in exceptional cases. Of course, if you want to pick up the connectToServer exceptions then you can use something like:

public bool login()
{
    try
    {
        return connectToServer(Path,username,password);
    }
    catch(exception ex)//or the specific exception you are after
    {
        return false;
    }
}

meaning that the exceptional occasion of the failure will be picked up by the exception, but most of the time the exception will not be called.

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