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How do I access all lines after the line on which a pattern matched occur For example

BCDA
ABCD
AAAABBBBCCCCDDD
AAAAAABBBBBBCCC
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA

So basically after the pattern ABCD is matched i want to process all the lines after it.Put it in an array.So do a pattern match only once .

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3  
Can you clarify your question? Put what into an array? Match what pattern only once? –  kevlar1818 Jul 28 '11 at 20:26
    
so i want to process the lines after the pattern has been matched.So in an array i would want to put the lines after ABCD.I want to the loop over each line and then do some comparison.For that i would want to store all the lines AFTER the matched pattern in order to store them. –  kunal Jul 28 '11 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

This is the simplest example I can think of for what it sounds like you are looking for. It puts "all the lines after " the line that matched into an array.

my @lines;
while ( <$in> ) { 
    next unless m/ABCD/;
    # in an list context, this will slurp the rest of the file.
    @lines = <$in>;
}
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+1 for simplicity and "my thoughts exactly". Though you should make the regex /^ABCD$/, or similarly strict. –  TLP Jul 28 '11 at 21:47
    
so what you have written above,will it also consider the line ABCD? –  kunal Jul 28 '11 at 23:01
    
It will take all the lines in the file after ABCD is found, but not the ABCD line itself. –  TLP Jul 28 '11 at 23:12
    
Thanks, TLP. @kunal, the marker line is already consumed by the iterator in the while, so all that's left is the lines afterward, and copying a file iterator to an array, slurps in all those lines. –  Axeman Jul 29 '11 at 11:33
    
@TLP. i want to include the line ABCD too...is there a way? Its liek i have to search for a particular string and when that string occurs,start processing(storing) the lines from the 1st occurance of that string –  kunal Jul 29 '11 at 15:02

A bit unclear, but is this what you are after?

The range operator is ideal for this sort of task:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my @array;

while (<DATA>)  {
  push @array, $_ if /ABCD/ .. 0
}
shift(@array);

print @array;

__DATA__
BCDA
ABCD
AAAABBBBCCCCDDD
AAAAAABBBBBBCCC
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA

Outputs:

AAAABBBBCCCCDDD
AAAAAABBBBBBCCC
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA
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I didn't know you could put the data at the end of the same file that the Perl code is in! Thanks Fredrik. –  Literat Jul 28 '11 at 21:37
    
well yes this is what i am after though i dont want to print the lines but store it in an array.but yes you are right,this is what i am looking for. –  kunal Jul 28 '11 at 22:41
    
What did you have in mind by putting eof() inside a pattern match? Better would be push @array, $_ if /ABCD/ .. 0. Also you can print the array directly: print @array. –  FMc Jul 29 '11 at 0:41
    
@FMc - for the eof() part I blame temporal insanity; for the print part, it was for clarity, since I expected that the OP would like to do something with the content in the array (updated answer). Thanks! –  Fredrik Pihl Jul 29 '11 at 21:36
    
Note that using 0 there could cause unfortunate behaviour if a data line contains a 0 character - probably better to use undef instead. –  NetMage Jan 22 at 0:22

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