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According to microsoft documentation, the behavior of the 'BETWEEN' operator should be a closed interval both on the left and the right side, however, the following code:

SELECT CASE WHEN (1 BETWEEN 1 AND 2) THEN 'YEAH' ELSE 'NO' END AS [closed in the left],
       CASE WHEN (1 BETWEEN 2 AND 1) THEN 'YEAH' ELSE 'NO' END AS [closed in the right]

shows otherwise. Can you reproduce it? What do you think?

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When logic fails it's time to take a break... techrepublic.com/blog/project-management/… –  Lynx Kepler Jul 28 '11 at 21:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The minimum value must always be specified first when using BETWEEN. The documentation you cited indicates that:

BETWEEN returns TRUE if the value of test_expression is greater than or equal to the value of begin_expression and less than or equal to the value of end_expression.

so your second CASE is actually testing:

1 >= 2 AND 1 <= 1
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+1 Right, if you think about it in English it is quite logical - do you ever say "between 10 and 5 dollars" or "between 10 PM and 8 PM"? –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 28 '11 at 20:33
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+1, and I'll add one thing. The correct "closed on the right" test would look like this: CASE WHEN (2 BETWEEN 1 AND 2) THEN 'YEAH' ELSE 'NO' END AS [closed in the right] –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 28 '11 at 20:35

The documentation you link to says:

BETWEEN returns TRUE if the value of test_expression is greater than or equal to the value of begin_and less than or equal to the value of end_expression.

so the results you are getting are correct. The BETWEEN is simply a shorthand.

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It also should be stated somewhere (I haven't read it completely) that the value on the left should be smaller or equal to the value on the right. You shouldn't code backwards just because the documentation may not tell you explicitly enough not to. :-)

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