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I was creating a faster string splitter method. First, I wrote a non-tail recursive version returning List. Next, a tail recursive one using ListBuffer and then calling toList (+= and toList are O(1)). I fully expected the tail recursive version to be faster, but that is not the case.

Can anyone explain why?

Original version:

def split(s: String, c: Char, i: Int = 0): List[String] = if (i < 0) Nil else {
  val p = s indexOf (c, i)
  if (p < 0) s.substring(i) :: Nil else s.substring(i, p) :: split(s, c, p + 1)
}

Tail recursive one:

import scala.annotation.tailrec
import scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer
def split(s: String, c: Char): Seq[String] = {
  val buffer = ListBuffer.empty[String]
  @tailrec def recurse(i: Int): Seq[String] =  {
    val p = s indexOf (c, i)
    if (p < 0) {
      buffer += s.substring(i)
      buffer.toList
    } else {
      buffer += s.substring(i, p)
      recurse(p + 1)
    }
  }
  recurse(0)
}

This was benchmarked with code here, with results here, by #scala's jyxent.

share|improve this question
    
@pst No, ListBuffer's += is truly O(1). –  Daniel C. Sobral Jul 28 '11 at 21:30
    
My guess is that it has something to do with the use of ListBuffer and not the fact that you're using tail recursion. Just because those operations are O(1) doesn't mean they're necessarily as fast as cons. They're just within a constant factor of its speed. Have you done any tests to try to establish the baseline performance of ListBuffer vs. cons operations? –  Gravity Jul 28 '11 at 21:43
    
Could be a difference in GC overhead? –  Alex Cruise Jul 28 '11 at 22:51
    
Why should the tail-recursive version be significantly faster? It doesn't eat up stack space, which is cool, but the work seems about equivalent. –  Malvolio May 1 '12 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You expect the tail recursive version to be faster due to the tail call optimization and I think this is right, if you compare apples to apples:

def split3(s: String, c: Char): Seq[String] = {
  @tailrec def recurse(i: Int, acc: List[String] = Nil): Seq[String] =  {
    val p = s indexOf (c, i)
    if (p < 0) {
      s.substring(i) :: acc
    } else {
      recurse(p + 1, s.substring(i, p) :: acc)
    }
  }
  recurse(0) // would need to reverse
}

I timed this split3 to be faster, except of course to get the same result it would need to reverse the result.

It does seem ListBuffer introduces inefficiencies that the tail recursion optimization cannot make up for.

Edit: thinking about avoiding the reverse...

def split3(s: String, c: Char): Seq[String] = {
  @tailrec def recurse(i: Int, acc: List[String] = Nil): Seq[String] =  {
    val p = s lastIndexOf (c, i)
    if (p < 0) {
      s.substring(0, i + 1) :: acc
    } else {
      recurse(p - 1, s.substring(p + 1, i + 1) :: acc)
    }
  }
  recurse(s.length - 1)
}

This has the tail call optimization and avoids ListBuffer.

share|improve this answer

You're simply doing more work in the second case. In the first case, you might overflow your stack, but every operation is really simple, and :: is as small of a wrapper as you can get (all you have to do is create the wrapper and point it to the head of the other list). In the second case, not only do you create an extra collection initially and have to form a closure around s and buffer for the nested method to use, but you also use the heavierweight ListBuffer which has to check for each += whether it's already been copied out to a list, and uses different code paths depending on whether it's empty or not (in order to get the O(1) append to work).

share|improve this answer
    
Mmmmm. I did not consider s and buffer closures. I wonder if it would be faster if I had them as parameters instead... And now that I think of it, on the other hand I did not have to return buffer from recurse -- I could just return buffer at the end of split. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jul 29 '11 at 12:37
    
I think you are correct -- that was my suspicion, though you made a very interesting point about the closures. However, I'm going to accept huynhjl's answer instead, as he went to the trouble of showing the tail recursion does bring performance gains if all other facts are equal. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jul 29 '11 at 12:41
    
Oh, and when I say "I think you are correct", I'm not doubting anything you said. I was just wondering, when I asked the question, if I was missing something else (like the closures). I suppose we could still be missing something. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jul 29 '11 at 12:44

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