Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading C++ Primer and the author says,

"If a class is defined inside a namespace, then an otherwise undeclared friend function is declared in the same namespace:

      namespace A {
        class C {
          public:
            friend void f(const C&); // makes f a member of namespace A
        };
      }

Doesn't it mean that I don't have to declare function f() again inside namespace?

When I simply define function f() outside of namespace as

void
A::f(const C& obj)
{
  std::cout << "f(const C&) " << std::endl;
}

I get error from g++ 4.5 saying,

FriendDeclarations1.cpp:40:23: error: ‘void A::f(const A::C&)’ should have been declared inside ‘A’

Can anyone please tell me what does the author imply?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

What the author means is that the friend function is implicitly declared within the same class namespace if its namespace is not stated explicitly.

So f needs to defined within namespace A

#include <iostream>

namespace A {
  class C {
    friend void f(const C&); // makes f a member of namespace A
    int i;

    public:
      C() : i(42) {}
  };

  void f(const A::C& obj)
  {
    std::cout << "f(const A::C&) " << std::endl;
    std::cout << "obj.i = " << obj.i << std::endl;      // access private member
  }
}

int main()
{
  A::C ac;

  f(ac);
  return 0;
}

You can change this behavior by explicitly stating the namespace that f belongs to

#include <iostream>

// forward declarations
namespace A { class C; }
namespace B { void f(const A::C&); }

namespace A {
  class C {
    friend void B::f(const C&);
    int i;

  public:
    C() : i(42) {}
  };
}

namespace B {
  void f(const A::C& obj)
  {
    std::cout << "f(const A::C&) " << std::endl;
    std::cout << "obj.i = " << obj.i << std::endl;      // access private member
  }
}

int main()
{
  A::C ac;

  B::f(ac);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Standard 7.3.1.2 / 3 :

Every name first declared in a namespace is a member of that namespace. If a friend declaration in a non-local class first declares a class or function83) the friend class or function is a member of the innermost enclosing namespace. The name of the friend is not found by simple name lookup until a matching declaration is provided in that namespace scope (either before or after the class declaration granting friendship).

share|improve this answer

What you have there is interpreted as a class member definition, for a class declaration that looks like this:

class A {
  void f(const C& obj);
}

You should define f this way:

namespace A {
  void f(const C& obj)
  {
    std::cout << "f(const C&) " << std::endl;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.