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Using a shared repo (core.sharedRepository=group) we ran into some issues with git creating read-only (permissions 444) files. No matter which git config items I twiddle there always seems to be some read-only meta-data created on the server side when we push. These files are in .git/ (or objects/ in a bare repo).

Do you really never need to write to these files again (regardless of what git operations you perform)? They may be representative of commit deltas, so really should not be changed, but I was hoping someone could clarify this.

For the inquisitive, the relevant lines look to be 856 and 867 of builtin/index-pack.c in git.

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umask in the ENV correctly set ? –  sleeplessnerd Jul 29 '11 at 0:27
    
Yes, the ENV umask is 007. –  Matthew Jul 30 '11 at 6:04

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Those files are part of the object database, which really is read-only. No matter what you do with Git, you can't change the contents of a specific object once it has been created.

Note that if you back out a commit and create a new one in its place, you'll be creating a new object with a new identifier and new contents. Git will eventually perform its garbage collection to remove the old, unreferenced object(s).

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Thanks, Greg. I was hoping for some references to documentation. Is this reported anywhere in the git docs? –  Matthew Jul 30 '11 at 6:58
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@Matthew: Here's one reference in the Git wiki: git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Git#Implementation You can find others by searching for "git object database immutable". –  Greg Hewgill Jul 30 '11 at 10:55
    
Thanks, Greg. Good tip. –  Matthew Aug 2 '11 at 4:40

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