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I was mildly surprised when the compiler complained about this:

public class UsefulClass
{
    public const String RatingName = @"Ratings\rating";
}

public class OtherClass
{
    public void SomeFunc()
    {
        UsefulClass useful = new UsefulClass();
        String rating = useful.RatingName;
    }
}

Compiler says, "Static member cannot be accessed with an instance reference; qualify it with a type name instead"

This isn't a problem, String rating = UsefulClass.RatingName; works fine. I'm just curious what the thinking is behind this? I have an instance of a public class with a public constant on it, why can't I get the data this way?

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2  
It's horrid language design that severely violates en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_access_principle ... there's no reason for it, and they could fix it, with no impact on existing code, in a moment. –  Jim Balter May 31 '14 at 4:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Because constants just aren't instance members; they're statically bound to their respective types. In the same way you can't invoke static methods using instances, you can't access class constants using instances.

If you need to get a constant off an instance without knowing its type first-hand, I suppose you could do it with reflection based on its type.

If you're trying to add a member that can't be modified but pertains to instances, you probably want read-only fields or properties instead.

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2  
You could also wrap the constant in a getter. –  Eric J. Jul 29 '11 at 0:45
    
@BoltClock, I tried to test your point with String something = this.RatingName inside UsefulClass and got the same error, which is consistent with your answer. I've always assumed String something = RatingName is looking at the instance, but I see now it's uses the Class.Variable description of a static. –  TomDestry Jul 29 '11 at 1:07
    
@TomDestry: That's right, just like how you call a class's own static methods using StaticMethod() rather than this.StaticMethod(). –  BoltClock Jul 29 '11 at 1:07
    
@BoltClock, Thanks, glad I asked now. –  TomDestry Jul 29 '11 at 1:12

A "variable" marked const is a compile time construct, not an instance member. You can access it like you would a static variable:

public void SomeFunc()
{
    UsefulClass useful = new UsefulClass();
    String rating = UsefulClass.RatingName; // Access as if static
}

That being said, I would personally wrap this into a property if it's meant to be used as you described, like so:

public class UsefulClass
{
    private const string ratingName = @"Ratings\rating";

    public string RatingName { get { return ratingName; } }
}

This would make your syntax work, but also be a better design, IMO, since it doesn't expose your constants publically.

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I disagree with the plan of wrapping it in a getter (that's wrong), but you've provided the right answer initially, at least (so I upvoted you). –  Noon Silk Jul 29 '11 at 0:52
    
@NoonSilk, Why is it wrong? –  TomDestry Jul 29 '11 at 1:08
    
@Noon Silk: I would suggest that this is correct, and not wrong, if the data should be associated with an instance (RatingName). This was how the OP showed it, in which case, it's instance level data, and should be wrapped in a property (even if it's always returning a constant). That makes the "constant" nature an implementation detail of the type itself. –  Reed Copsey Jul 29 '11 at 1:39
    
Um, if you don't want to expose your constants publicly, declare them private. Not allowing access to public constants via instances is stupid language design that, like all violations of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_access_principle , expose implementation details. There's no semantic difference between const int foo = 3 and readonly int foo = 3, but the language requires that they be qualified differently. –  Jim Balter May 31 '14 at 4:25
    
@JimBalter I do have the constant declared privately here - I'm not sure where your criticism lies, at least with regard to my answer. –  Reed Copsey Jun 2 '14 at 3:25

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