Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for an opinion on something. Consider the following code from a class called SomeApiObject:

// Property with private setter
public IList<string> SomeList
{
    get;
    private set;
}

// Constructor
public SomeApiObject()
{
    SomeList = new List<string>();
}

With this setup, users of the class SomeApiObject cannot reassign the SomeList property, but what they can do is to manipulate the existing list by using methods such as Add(), Remove(), and Clear().

The upside of this pattern is that the property is guaranteed to never be null, which can be a very convenient assumption to make as a user is working with the API, since it means the user can always iterate over the list, get the list's size, or add to it without ever having to check for null.

I see a few downsides. For one, it's not necessarily obvious to a user that the list is intended to be writable by manipulating its contents. For another, I could envision situations where manipulating the list is less convenient syntactically or possibly worse in performance than assigning a new list.

I'm on the fence with this one, and I'm seeking opinions.

  • Are the potential downsides just too obnoxious for a user of the API?
  • Is the guarantee of never being null as nice a feature as I think it is?

EDIT:

I'm already convinced of the benefits of using some sort of "never null" pattern. What I'm more interested in is for someone to play devil's advocate and show me why having a private setter on a list that's meant to be manipulated might be annoying and/or prohibitive from the perspective of a user of the API.

I released a .NET API wrapper some time ago, and so far a few users have expressed confusion over how to assign values to properties like this one.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Never null is a good design feature. In regards to only exposing lists as read only properties this is put forward as a recommendation in the my favorite guidelines book: http://www.amazon.com/Framework-Design-Guidelines-Conventions-Libraries/dp/0321545613

Though a better approach is not to allow external callers to manipulate the state of your object directly and to make the class immutable:

public class MyClass
{
   private List<string> _inner = new List<string>();

   public IEnumerable<string> Items
   {
      get { return _inner.GetEnumerator(); }
   }

   public void AddItem(string item);
   {
      _inner.Add(item);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is a very good answer. I like the explicitness; it does not require users of the class to infer intent by examining the type of every property. –  Paul Phillips Jul 29 '11 at 1:52
    
+1 for an excellent answer, I like how it makes the intent much clearer. Do you see any downsides, though? I'm not sure I like the syntax implications. I prefer being able to say obj.Items.Add() or obj.Items.Remove() rather than using obj.Items, obj.AddItem() & obj.RemoveItem(). –  David Mills Jul 29 '11 at 2:14
    
@David Mills - context is everything and it depends on the relationship between the class and the Items. If the class provides functionality based on the items it may be perfectly legit to have Add / Remove methods. The above is intended to promote encapsulation while reducing coupling -- notice that callers have no knowledge of how the state is maintained? In scenarios where mutability and coupling aren't a concern (say a temporary state bag) exposing the list for easy manipulation might be justifiable. –  bryanbcook Jul 29 '11 at 3:36

If you want to remove the possibility of users getting a reference to the list then simply manipulating it externally in an unintended manner, then you should change your property to only return an IEnumerable instead.

public IEnumerable<string> SomeList
{
   get { return list.GetEnumerator(); }
   private set {}
}

This will allow the user to still make use of the collection (also will support linq) and will protect the collection from external manipulation.

share|improve this answer
    
a list IS an IEnumerable<T>, use the collection that makes sense. If its a List<T>, I can cast it back to a List<T>, even if the API returns IEnumerable<T> –  Muad'Dib Jul 29 '11 at 1:33
    
+1 - I like exposing the IEnumerable. Didn't think of that initially. –  David Hoerster Jul 29 '11 at 1:37
    
I'm not looking to prevent the user from manipulating the list. In fact, the intention is for the user to manipulate it with methods like Add() and Remove(). –  David Mills Jul 29 '11 at 1:39
    
I think this is a good idea but the example you've given doesn't compile, since you have to either have both get/set be automatic or both manually implemented. –  Paul Phillips Jul 29 '11 at 1:40
    
@Muad'Dib That is simply incorrect. Try writing code that instantiates a List<string> object, then assigned another object to the list's iterator, then try casting the iterator to a List<string> object. You will get a compiler error. As to why you are incorrect: You have made a classic mistake, a List<T> implements IEnumerable. Therefore, a List<T> is an IEnumerable ... However, the inverse is not true, a IEnumerable IS NOT a List<T>. –  Feisty Mango Jul 29 '11 at 1:42

One other point to consider is that the question depends on whether the object "owns" the list (composition) or "has" the list (aggregation). If the object owns the list, the setter should be private; if it simply has the list from another object, the setter could possibly be public.

A complication in the composition case (other than the possibility of the list being assigned a null value) is that a public setter causes the class to cede all control over the implementation of the list. Suppose, for instance, you have the implementation:

public IList<string> SomeList
{
    get;
    private set;
}
public SomeApiObject()
{
    SomeList = new List<string>();
}

Now suppose in a subsequent version, you want to use SomeSpecializedList, which implements IList<string>, instead of List<String>. You could easily refactor:

private SomeSpecializedList specializedList;
public IList<string> SomeList
{
    get {return specializedList;}
    private set {specializedList = value as SomeSpecializedList;}
}

public SomeApiObject()
{
    SomeList = new SomeSpecializedList<string>();
}

Only the private implementation has changed; users of the class are unaffected. But if the setter were public, the client could have potentially passed any IList instance into SomeList, and this would be a breaking change.

share|improve this answer
    
IMHO, one of the biggest failings of Java and the .NET languages is that there's no convention for distinguishing aggregation from composition. Indeed, there's not really any good pattern in many cases for an object to expose a List<T>, since there's no clear concept of ownership beyond "hope for the best". –  supercat Oct 18 '13 at 23:06

it depends on the situation. in some cases, it might make sense to be able to have a null list, in other not so much. you have to ask yourself if it makes sense. .net itself does it both ways.

share|improve this answer

As much as I hate saying this, it really depends on what you're trying to do with your API. If you want to provide the user with a collection that they can work with, then @Matthew's answer is appropriate. If you want to hide the collection or only allow certain actions to be permitted (like Add, Remove, etc.), then you could hide the collection and expose a facade to the collection:

private IList<string> _someList = new List<string>();

public void Add(string item){ _someList.Add(item); }
public string Remove(string item) { return _someList.Remove(item); }
...

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.