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By 'promote' I mean make access more restrictive and by 'demote' I mean make less restrictive.

For example, when class B is derived from class A using : protected or : private then the public members of A get promoted, to protected and private, respectively.

Could some class C ever come in and derive itself from class B, while at the same time demoting the inherited members of class A back to their original access specifications?

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i feel your usage of "promote" and "demote" should be swap around. –  YeenFei Jul 29 '11 at 2:30
2  
you must be some sort of hippy, thinking of less restrictions as a promotion :) –  Jimmy Jul 29 '11 at 2:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you're using protected derivation, then class C could indeed give access to the protected members, by creating an appropriate wrapper:

class A {
public:
  void F();
};

class B : protected A { };

class C : public B {
public:
  using B::F;
};

This also can be made to work with data members:

class A {
public:
  int n;
};

class B : protected A { };

class C : public B {
public:
  using B::n;
  C() : n(this->B::n) { }
};

With private inheritance this is not directly possible, because C cannot itself access members in A.. However, if B is derived from A using private virtual inheritance, it becomes possible again:

class A {
public:
  void F();
};

class B : private virtual A { };

class C : public B, public virtual A { };

int main() {
  C x;
  x.F();
  return 0;
}

This works because with virtual inheritance, C can derive directly from the same instance of A as B, but with a different access specifier.

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Okay, I'm well on my way to understanding your awesome answer. For the protected case, it works! Super cool wrapper. I even changed class A to class A { protected: void F(); }; and then you can still call c.F() but you can't call a.F() which I think is super funny and awesome. Making it private kills the fun. Can you get the same trick to work on data? I guess you'd need some sort of wrapper, so you'd always end up calling a function and needing () when you try to get at the value? Still working on understanding the virtual part of your answer... –  Jimmy Jul 29 '11 at 2:50
    
@Jimmy, added an example of data members –  bdonlan Jul 29 '11 at 2:55
    
That is excellent. Works just like the function part (and protected stays protected in class A). Worst of all, I think I fully get it. It's like class C is saying to the world "No baby, no. I'm not a class C. I'm a class B. I promise I'll be gentle." ... or something like that ... so can you get that to jump up two levels? I've never had much luck with chained scope resolution operators. –  Jimmy Jul 29 '11 at 3:14
1  
using A::F; is rather less hacky than writing wrapper functions or adding reference members. –  Mike Seymour Jul 29 '11 at 3:25
    
@Mike, ah, forgot about that :) updated –  bdonlan Jul 29 '11 at 4:20

A using declaration can give access to public or protected members of protected base classes:

struct A {int x;};
struct B : protected A {};

struct C : B
{
    using A::x;  // publicly accessible
}

Obviously, private members and base classes aren't available to C, so you can't reduce the restrictions on them.

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Of course not, what would be the point of having private or protected inheritance if I can just create another derived that class that blows away the intermediate class' access restrictions and makes everything public?

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I actually thought about that before asking my question... at first I only thought of blowing things away by making them public, but then I thought more deeply about moving private things back to being protected. I think that would be fun. Too bad for me I guess. –  Jimmy Jul 29 '11 at 2:05
    
Some argue (and perhaps I agree) against protected methods more generally for a similar reason. You can always make a wrapper exposing the same function under a new name. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 4 '12 at 12:30

No. Because, when class C derives class B; it doesn't know about the original access specifiers of class A. It just respects the access specifiers in class B.

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