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I am pasting my client and server code below. My program is running fine, except that i am trying to send an ipaddress in my src and dest field, and for some reason, even though i am sending it as 131.199.166.232, it is printing as 232.166.199.131. But rest of my packet values are printed in a proper way. I have used memcpy(), so I feel its a memcpy thing, which somewhere I did wrong, but in Beej's guide as there is a section @ the byte ordering in different computer architectures.....I have not used htonl() and all, so maybe it is because of that.Please guide me as where I am going wrong. Also kindly tell me the way i am sending data, how should the htonl() function can be used in my code....Thanks in advance.

Client:

       #include <stdio.h>
     #include <stdlib.h>
     #include <string.h>
     #include <math.h>
     #include <sys/types.h>
     #include <sys/socket.h>
     #include <netinet/in.h>
     #include <netdb.h>
     #define MAXPROFILES  2

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])

  {
    int sockfd, portno, n;
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr;
    struct hostent *server;
    unsigned char buf[1024];
    unsigned int srcAddress = 2193598184;
    unsigned int destAddress = 2193598182;

   struct profile_t
 {
   unsigned char length;
   unsigned char type;
   unsigned char *data;
 };

   typedef struct profile_datagram_t
 {
unsigned char src[4];
unsigned char dst[4];
unsigned char ver;
unsigned char n;
struct profile_t profiles[MAXPROFILES];
 } header;


    header outObj;

    int j =0;
    int i =0;
   // for loop for doing the malloc so that we can allocate memory to all profiles
    for(i=0;i<MAXPROFILES;i++){
outObj.profiles[i].data = malloc(5);
  }


    for(i=3;i>=0;i--){
outObj.src[i] = (srcAddress >> (i*8)) & 0xFF;
outObj.dst[i] = (destAddress >> (i*8)) & 0xFF;
printf("%d",outObj.src[i]);
 }
    outObj.ver = 1;
    outObj.n = 2;

    memcpy(buf,&outObj.src,4);
    memcpy(buf+4,&outObj.dst,4);
    memcpy(buf+8,&outObj.ver,1);
    memcpy(buf+9,&outObj.n,1);


    outObj.profiles[0].length = 5;
    outObj.profiles[0].type = 1;
    outObj.profiles[1].length = 5;
    outObj.profiles[1].type = 2;

    for(i=0;i<MAXPROFILES;i++){
for(j=0;j<5;j++){
    outObj.profiles[i].data[j] = j+1;
}

}

    int k = 10;

        // for loop to do memcopy of length,type and data.
    for(i=0;i<MAXPROFILES;i++){
memcpy(buf+k,&outObj.profiles[0].length,1);
memcpy(buf+k+1,&outObj.profiles[0].type,1);
memcpy(buf+k+2,outObj.profiles[0].data,5);
k +=7;

}

   if (argc < 3) {
   fprintf(stderr,"usage: %s hostname port\n", argv[0]);
   exit(0);
}
   portno = atoi(argv[2]); //Convert ASCII to integer
   sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0); // socket file descriptor


   if (sockfd < 0)
   error("ERROR DETECTED !!! Problem in opening socket\n");

   server = gethostbyname(argv[1]);
   if (server == NULL) {
   fprintf(stderr,"ERROR DETECTED !!!, no such server found \n");
    exit(0);
}

  bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)); //clear the memory for server address

  serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
  bcopy((char *)server->h_addr,
        (char *)&serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr,
     server->h_length);

  serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);

  printf("Client 1 trying to connect with server host %s on port %d\n", argv[1], portno);


  if (connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&serv_addr,sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0)
  error("ERROR in connection");

      printf("SUCCESS !!! Connection established \n");


   if (write(sockfd, buf, k) < 0)
   {
  error("Write error has occured ");
   }


  return 0;

Server:

          #include <stdio.h>
           #include <stdlib.h>
           #include <string.h>
           #include <sys/types.h>
           #include <sys/socket.h>
           #include <netinet/in.h>
           #define MAXPROFILES  2

           int main(int argc, char *argv[])
        {
           int sockfd, newsockfd, portno, clilen;
           struct sockaddr_in serv_addr, cli_addr;
           unsigned char buf[1024];
           int my_data2[10] = {1,3,9,10};
           int my_data[10] = {1,2,3,4,5};
       int myDataBinary[500] = {0};
       int myDataBinary2[500] = {0};
       int recData[500] = {0};
       int index1=0;


       struct profile_t
        {
        unsigned char length;
        unsigned char type;
        unsigned char *data;
        };

            typedef struct profile_datagram_t
       {
        unsigned char src[4];
        unsigned char dst[4];
        unsigned char ver;
        unsigned char n;
       struct profile_t profiles[MAXPROFILES];
        } header;


            header outObj;

        int j =0;
        int i =0;



            if (argc < 2) {
            fprintf(stderr,"usage: %s port_number1",argv[0]);
            exit(1);
         }
            sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
            if (sockfd < 0)
            error("ERROR DETECTED !!! Problem in opening socket");

            bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
            portno = atoi(argv[1]);

            serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
            serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
            serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);

            if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0)
            error("ERROR DETECTED !!! There was a problem in binding");

            listen(sockfd, 10);
            clilen = sizeof(cli_addr);



             printf("Server listening on port number %d...\n", serv_addr.sin_port);

             newsockfd = accept(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *) &cli_addr, &clilen);

             if (newsockfd < 0)
         error("ERROR DETECTED !!! the connection request was not accepted");

         int rc = read(newsockfd,buf,100);
         if(rc < 0){
     printf("error");
      }
         else {
        printf("success %d",rc);
      }


      memcpy(&outObj.src,buf+0,4);
      memcpy(&outObj.dst,buf+4,4);
      memcpy(&outObj.ver,buf+8,1);
      memcpy(&outObj.n,buf+9,1);

          printf("\nsrc ip = ");
          for(int i=0;i<4;i++){
       printf("%d ",outObj.src[i]);
       }

          printf("\ndest ip = ");
          for(int i=0;i<4;i++){
         printf("%d ",outObj.src[i]);
        }

         printf("\nversion = %d",outObj.ver);
         printf("\nnumber = %d",outObj.n);

         int k = 10;

         for(i=0;i<outObj.n;i++){
     memcpy(&outObj.profiles[i].length,buf+k,1);
     memcpy(&outObj.profiles[i].type,buf+k+1,1);
     outObj.profiles[i].data = malloc(outObj.profiles[i].length);
     memcpy(outObj.profiles[i].data,buf+k+2,5);
        k +=7;
       }

         for(int i=0;i<outObj.n;i++){
    printf("\nMessage %d :",i+1);
    printf("\nLength : %d",outObj.profiles[i].length);
    printf("\nType : %d",outObj.profiles[i].type);
    for(int j=0;j<5;j++){
        printf("\ndata %d : %d",j,outObj.profiles[i].data[j]);
    }
}


         for(int i=0; i<sizeof(my_data)/sizeof(int);i++)
      {
     if(my_data[i] > 0){
    index1 = my_data[i];
    myDataBinary[index1] = 1;
    printf("my data %d = %d\n",index1,myDataBinary[index1]);
}
}

       for(int i=0; i<sizeof(my_data2)/sizeof(int);i++)
{
    if(my_data2[i] > 0){
        index1 = my_data2[i];
        myDataBinary2[index1] = 1;
        printf("my data %d = %d\n",index1,myDataBinary2[index1]);
    }
}


         int sumRecievedData = 0;
         int sumMyData = 0;
         int sumMultpliedData = 0;
         float Cov =0;
         float sdMyData = 0;
         float sdRecievedData =0;
         int n = 500;
         float rho;

                for(int i=0;i<outObj.n;i++){
              index1=0;
              for (int j=0; j<outObj.profiles[i].length;j++) {

               if(outObj.profiles[i].data[j] > 0){
               index1 = outObj.profiles[i].data[j];
               recData[index1] = 1;
              printf("rec data %d = %d\n",index1,recData[index1]);
       }
     }
   }


        return 0;

    }
share|improve this question
1  
htnol is designed to work on long int values. What do you expect it to do with a char *? –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 29 '11 at 2:04
    
@Oli: stackoverflow.com/questions/6863216/… is the link which has my code and question. –  user537670 Jul 29 '11 at 2:09
    
basically i want to do byte-byte ordering for sending and receiving data. i have a unsigned char buf, which I am using to send data and recv data –  user537670 Jul 29 '11 at 2:11
    
tl;dr. Please edit this question to make your intention clear. –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 29 '11 at 2:12
    
individual chars do not have a byte ordering. Only things larger than a char (2+ bytes) need to worry about byte ordering. A char array could be interpreted as: N chars, N / 2 shorts, N / 4 ints, etc etc. –  Chris Jul 29 '11 at 2:16
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2 Answers

an ip address is really just an array of unsigned char.

uchar ip[] = {127,0,0,1};

Is a fine representation for a loopback address. But an array of four bytes, and a int really aren't that large; with one exception endiannes! So suppose I create the int which represents that ip. A naive approach might be:

 int ip = (127<<24)|(0<<16)|(0<<8)|(1)

Of course, on little endian machines, like the x86 and arm it doing this:

char *char_ip = (void*)&ip;

and iterating over that aray would yield:

1, 0, 0, 127

But on a big endian machine, like a PowerPC, or a SPARC, we would have what we expect,

127, 0, 0, 1

Big endian is also known as "network byte order" which is what the n in htonl stands for: "host to network long". These functions are frequently used when reading or writing integers over the network. Suppose a server wants to send a client some number:

uint32_t important = htonl(42);
write(client, &important, sizeof important);

Then, to read it, the client goes:

uint32_t important;
read(server, &important, sizeof important);
important = ntohl(important);

The reason your ip address were flipped was because ip addresses are expected to be in network byte order, but yours were little endian instead. htonl on an int-type ip will flip it for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not understanding...how can an int be used to pass a char value...i mean how to use htonl(), if I have a char. –  user537670 Jul 29 '11 at 6:33
    
a 32-bit int is an array of four characters. all htonl does is reverse that array. If you only have a char, using htonl doesn't make sense. Do you see the for loop where you serialize the ip address? You're serializing it backwards. –  Dave Jul 29 '11 at 6:46
1  
Make your life easier: In your datagram structs, use uint32_t's instead of character arrays. Since ip addresses are always in network byte order, you don't even need to use htonl! –  Dave Jul 29 '11 at 6:48
add comment

This is way too much code for me to read, but if you just want to create a byte array for serializing, you don't need any special functions at all, you can just write it algebraically:

unsigned char buf[sizeof(uint_type)];

uint_type value;

for (size_t i = 0; i != sizeof(uint_type); ++i)
{
  // Little-endian
  buf[i] = value >> (i * CHAR_BIT);

  // Big-endian
  buf[sizeof(uint_type - i - 1)] = value >> (i * CHAR_BIT);
}

Note that this code is independent of your system's endianness.


Since you asked, the htonl/ntohl functions are for dealing with uint32_t integers directly, without explicit char arrays:

uint32_t value;

myfile.read((char*)&value, sizeof(value));  // network endianness
value = ntohl(value);                       // host endianness

/* fiddle fiddle */

value = htonl(value);
yourfile.write((const char*)&value, sizeof(value));

(More typically you'd be writing to a socket rather than a file, I suppose.)

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain me how to use htonl for unsigned char?? –  user537670 Jul 29 '11 at 2:44
    
No, because you cannot. It operates on uint32_ts. It is typically used if you already deserialized blindly into an integer and need potential bit swapping. –  Kerrek SB Jul 29 '11 at 2:46
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