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So I am primarily a C# and Java developer but I suppose this question could pertain to any programming languages that uses StringBuilder or some derivative thereof.

Okay so it is more or less common knowledge that concatenate even a small number of strings can be a major performance killer (although even that is debatable). My question is does anyone have knowledge of the performance effects of using a string builder within a string builder. To clarify what I mean by that let me include some dummy code that should help illustrate my point.

Also I realize that there is naturally a performance hit by calling multiple instances of StringBuilder but I do not believe that I would be calling it enough to cause any real performance issues. (This assumption may also be wrong any opinion on that would be helpful as well)

public string StringToGet()
{
     StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("Some Text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append(MethodThatCreatesAnotherString());
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append(MethodThatCreatesAnotherString());
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append(MethodThatCreatesAnotherString());
     //etc   

     return sb.toString();

}

private string MethodThatCreatesAnotherString()
{
     StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("Other text");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");
     sb.append("more text to add");

     return sb.ToString();
}

Logic tells me that this shouldn't be a problem, but something about this approach just does not seem to look right to me. Can anyone shed some light on the following questions

  1. Does this create a significantly larger performance hit than just not using additional methods and using a single StringBuilder
  2. Is the a reasonably acceptable practice.

Any onsite on this would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Typically, if the number of straight-up string concatenations are more than 5, it's better to use StringBuilder. If you have control over the methods that in turn build a string, why not consider passing your StringBuilder into the method?

public void MethodThatCreatesAnotherString(StringBuilder sb)
{
   // code that appends to StringBuilder
}

So, when it's time to call that function, you pass in your current StringBuilder, and you don't lose a performance hit, but it's at the expense of potential obfuscation.

That said, unless you're getting into the hundreds or thousands of these operations, I wouldn't worry about premature optimization here. Your main performance hit is having to do it twice (i.e. append the strings inside the method, and then appending the complete string), but you still won't be taking the performance hit to the extent of using + concatenation.

Edit: A clarifying example of how to use it:

string SomeMethodCreatingAString()
{
   StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
   sb.append("more text to add");
   sb.append("more text to add");
   sb.append("more text to add");
   sb.append("more text to add");
   sb.append("more text to add");
   MethodThatCreatesAnotherString(sb);
   // more text
   return sb.ToString();
}

So, you don't ever append that string from the second method, you simply use the same StringBuilder within that method. Hopefully that makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a very good point drharris and @Scott Munro which I am someone embarrassed to say I did not consider. It sounds like under this method the original string builder simply sees the Append(SomeMethod()) as another string which would basically answer my question. –  pat8719 Jul 29 '11 at 2:23
    
I realized I didn't give actual instructions on how to call it. Hopefully you understood the intent, but in case someone else ever comes along, I added an example. Don't worry about not considering it; this is a design decision like everything else, and it's not always the best way to do it. By returning void, the method is hiding what it really does, which is sometimes not the best way to go. Sometimes you'd rather take the extra milliseconds of performance for clearer code. –  drharris Jul 29 '11 at 13:28
    
I understood your intent, but thank you anyway. Based on the general opinion of all of these answers I think, for the sake of clean code, I would be better off avoiding a 'void' return in the method, especially considering the fact that the performance hit is probably very minimal. . –  pat8719 Jul 29 '11 at 14:16

I am not sure about the performance implications but changing the signature of your MethodThatCreatesAnotherString method to accept a StringBuilder would remove the need for multiple instances of StringBuilder.

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As http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2009/01/the-sad-tragedy-of-micro-optimization-theater.html shows the difference between different ways of concatenating strings is really pretty minor until you get to really large numbers of concatenations.

Therefore, unless you already know you have a performance problem with this code then I think its fine. Your really only getting 3 extra string builder inits and 3 extra string allocations in your example.

In the long run you should just try to do what is simplest and only worry about complicated micro optimizations if you are sure you need them and testing bares them out.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is certainty a fair point however since I do tend to use StringBuilder instinctively so to speak my questions was really aimed at making sure that there wasn't something absolutely wrong with using so called 'embedded' StringBuilders. Thank you for sharing the article. –  pat8719 Jul 29 '11 at 2:38

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