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I have recently learned the basics of buffer overflows, and I have written a few very simple pieces of C/C++ code with unsafe buffers and have produced some interesting results.

Now my question is this: Can you name a program that's actually out there in the wild that has a known buffer overflow vulnerability? I am especially looking for something that runs over a network, if possible.

I have seen tutorials and read articles and even watched videos that have talked about/demonstrated the buffer overflow vulnerability in the Ability FTP Server ver. 2.34, but I can not for the life of me find a single copy of it online anywhere. I can find plenty of downloads of non-vulnerable versions, but non of the educationally useful ones. Any help on this front would also be appreciated.

Thanks a bunch.

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What exactly do you want to see? –  Jesus Ramos Jul 29 '11 at 3:53
    
Well, I would ultimately like to see arbitrary code executed, preferably across a network on a separate machine (both my machines). I'm just interested in an example that's as close to a field test as I can get without actually hacking someone's machine. –  KenB Jul 29 '11 at 3:58
    
As I mentioned above, I have done this. I would really like to test it on a full product that someone else wrote. –  KenB Jul 29 '11 at 4:02
    
Yeah I doubt that's going to be easy to come across as I would hope people would prevent against that as it is a common type of attack. Is there a specific reason you want to see a full product fall prey to a buffer overflow? Wouldn't you get the same results out of just writing a program that would be vulnerable, I mean the same thing would happen. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 29 '11 at 4:03
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I'm interested in learning about what exploits have actually been found and used in the past. It's an interesting subject to me, and I'd like to try out a few of them. Call it a whim. –  KenB Jul 29 '11 at 4:07

4 Answers 4

There is a great book which teaches exploiting buffer overflows (amongst other vulnerabilities). Book comes with a Linux LiveCD which is nicely set up with compilers/debuggers and plenty of exploitable programs.

Highly recommended if you haven't already picked it up:

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Hacking. The Art of Exploitation

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Have a quick pop over to Security Stack Exchange, where you will find questions such as this one, on the relevance of buffer overflows, two questions listing vulnerable servers and operating systems and useful folks to speak to regarding this sort of thing.

Or you could migrate the question over there.

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Can you name a program that's actually out there in the wild that has a known buffer overflow vulnerability?

Yes, but hopefully it will be patched before you are successfully able to demonstrate your attack. The longer a known vulnerability exists the more likely a the vulnerability will be patched (see queing theory). So, it is really the 'in the wild' part that is too restrictive. Why not try some historical vulnerabilities. The Buffer Overfolw Page at Perdue is a good place to start. They list RPC DCOM in ntdll.dll and Sendmail 8.11 has a Remote Buffer Overflow bug. Additionally telnetd has a buffer overflow bug you can find in FreeBSD 4.3-RELEASE systems.

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The ability server is super to practice on. I wrote a research paper about this some years ago, which you can access here:

http://blog.sat0ri.com/reverse-code-engineering/2009/03/finding-exploiting-and-fixing-bugs-in-binaries/

This give a good introduction to vulnerabilities and uses the method vulnerability as an example.

I hope it is useful!

Regards, sharpe

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