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Wondering if anyone can help me out. How can I line the content area with the top part of the box below. IE i dont want a 15px space at the top before the content.

I've tried the following which works, only problem is that the tiled content background is now displaying over my top background.

I've uploaded an example page here so that you can clearly understand what i'm getting at.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

.box {
    width:218px;
}
.box .top {
    width:100%; height:15px;
    background:url(sidebarTop.png) no-repeat;
}
.box .content {
    margin:-8px 0 0 0;  
    padding:0 10px;
    width:198px; 
    background:url(sidebarTile.png) repeat-y 0 8px;
    color:#FFF;
}
.box .bottom {
    width:100%; height:15px;
    background:url(sidebarBottom.png) no-repeat;
}

<div class="box">

    <div class="top"></div>
    <div class="content">
        Content goes here.
    </div>
    <div class="bottom"></div>

</div>
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4 Answers 4

Now that IE9 supports rounded corners, why not just use CSS3's border-radius property on a single div? You can even apply a drop shadow.

.box {
    padding:10px;
    border-radius:10px;
    -moz-border-radius:10px;
    box-shadow:0px 2px 3px #BBB;
    -moz-box-shadow:0px 2px 3px #BBB;
    -webkit-box-shadow:0px 2px 3px #BBB;
    background-color:brown;
    color:white;
    width:200px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/AlienWebguy/YYhgk/

share|improve this answer
    
As much as i'd prefer to use this approach, there are many user's out there still using IE8 and below. Any other suggestions? –  agh Jul 29 '11 at 4:35
    
If you want to use this approach, you can combine using it with CSS3Pie polyfill to mimic support for pre-IE9 browsers: css3pie.com –  kinakuta Jul 29 '11 at 4:47
    
@kinakuta - thanks i'll check this out. –  agh Jul 29 '11 at 4:58
1  
@agh - rounded corners don't make or break a sale. Twitter and facebook are the two most popular websites on the Internet. Facebook has zero rounded corners, and twitter uses CSS3 rounded corners which show up as normal corners in IE <= 8. Just a heads up it's not worth the time investing into something arguably so trivial ;) –  AlienWebguy Jul 29 '11 at 8:05

It's not ideal but you could try absolute positioning.

http://jsfiddle.net/imoda/XZWTt/

.box {
    width:218px;
}
.box .top {
    width:100%;
    height:15px;
    background:url(http://demo.bigg.co.za/_help/sidebarTop.png) no-repeat;
}
.box .content {
    margin:0 0 0 0;  
    padding:0 10px;
    width:198px; 
    background:url(http://demo.bigg.co.za/_help/sidebarTile.png) repeat-y 0 8px;
    color:#FFF;
    position: relative;
}
.content > p {
    position: absolute;
    top: -10px;
}

.box .bottom {
    width:100%;
    height:15px;
    background:url(http://demo.bigg.co.za/_help/sidebarBottom.png) no-repeat;
}
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Thanks, i recon this approach works the best. –  agh Jul 29 '11 at 4:49
    
Wait i take that back :), the height wont adjust according to the content now. –  agh Jul 29 '11 at 4:52
    
Which is why this isn't ideal. –  Steve Robbins Jul 29 '11 at 4:53

You don't need the negative margin on the content div, just give the containing div position: relative and give it a top position to place it where you want - for example: http://jsfiddle.net/H8TE2/

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This isn't really the answer to my problem but I have gone with kinakuta's suggestion of using external scripts to get the results I want in browsers that suck with css3

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