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I want to make a function f() that uses three values to compute its result: a, b, and e. e is dependent on a and b, so technically f() is only a function of a and b. But for the sake of readability, it is easier to look at a function containing the abstraction e than to look at a messier formula containing many a's and b's.

Is there any way to use dependent variables like e without the use of nested functions, which C++ does not allow?

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2  
Can you provide an example of what you are trying to do in code? –  Kratz Jul 29 '11 at 4:29
3  
Herb Sutter covered this in one of his gotw, he shows a few ways to simulate it: gotw.ca/gotw/058.htm –  Bunnit Jul 29 '11 at 4:35

6 Answers 6

C++ does have local variables, which makes this easy:

double f(double const a, double const b)
{
    double const e = a * b + b * b * b;
    return a + b + e;
}
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You can write a local struct which can define a static function, which can be used as if its nested function as:

int f(int a, int b)
{
   struct local
   {
        static int f(int a, int b, int e)
        {
             return e * (a + b);
        }
   };
   return local::f(a,b, a*b);
}
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e would be the output of local::f, so should be removed from its parameters and calculation... –  Tony D Jul 29 '11 at 4:59
    
@Tony: I described the technique, not the calculation. –  Nawaz Jul 29 '11 at 5:17

Not sure I understand your question, but if you're just after a way to make your function more readable by introducing a dependent variable, why not just calculate that variable in a separate function called by your main function:

float CalculateE(float a, float b)
{
    return (a + b);
}

float f(float a, float b)
{
    float e = CalculateE(a, b);
    return a + b + e;
}
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1  
If taking this approach, an option is to put CalculateE in an anonymous namespace immediately above, which emphasises that it's only a supporting function and not intended for direct usage outside the translation unit. –  Tony D Jul 29 '11 at 5:01

What's wrong with:

int compute_e(int a, int b)
{
    return whatever;
}

int func(int a, int b)
{
    int e = compute_e(a, b);
}
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Your second function doesn't return a value. –  iammilind Jul 29 '11 at 4:31

You can do this:

int f(int a, int b)
{
    struct LocalFunc
    {
        int operator()(int a, int b)
        {
            return a*b + b*b*b;
        }
    };
    LocalFunc e;
    return e(a,b)*a+b;
}
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I think that you can write some notes.

int FuncSum(int a, int b)
{
    //return the sum of a + b
    return a + b ;
}
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