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I tried asking before but I wasn't very clear so I'm re-asking it.

I want to have a variable that depends on the value of another variable, like b in this example:

int main(){
    int a;
    dependent int b=a+1; //I'm just making this up
    a=3;
    cout << b; //prints 4
    a=4;
    cout << b; //prints 5
}

Of course, this does not exist in C++, but this is what I want.

So instead I tried making a function:

int main(){
    int a;
    int b(){ return a+1; } //error
    a=3;
    cout << b(); //would print 4 if C++ allowed nested functions
    a=4;
    cout << b(); //would print 5 if C++ allowed nested functions
}

The above doesn't work because C++ doesn't allow nested functions.

I can only make functions outside of main(), like this:

int b(){
    return a+1; //doesn't work because a is not in scope
}

int main(){
    int a;
    a=3;
    cout << b();
    a=4;
    cout << b();
}

But this does not work because a is not in the same scope as b(), so I would have to pass a as a parameter and I don't want to do that.

Are there any tricks to get something similar to a dependent variable working in C++?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you need is a closure. If you can use C++ 0x features, you are in luck. Otherwise, you can define one manually:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
struct B
{
    const int & a;

    B(const int & a) : a(a) {}

    // variable syntax (Sean Farell's idea)
    operator int () const { return a + 1; }

    // function syntax
    int operator () () const { return a + 1; }
};
int main()
{
    int a;
    B b(a);
    a = 3;
    cout << b << '\n'; // variable syntax
    a = 4;
    cout << b() << '\n'; // function syntax
}

You can also define B inside main, but some compilers would not like it.

The C++ 0x lambda syntax looks like this:

auto b = [&]() { return a + 1; }

The [&] means that the lambda captures local variables by reference.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: a good minimal-change-from-what-the-OP-wanted fit for the question. You've been so careful to have const int& a and operator()() const, but forgotten to make the constructor's parameter const too! Cheers –  Tony D Jul 29 '11 at 5:47
    
@Tony: In a way, non-const parameter is also okay. because the const parameter would allow you to write B b(10) which shouldn't make sense. Non-const parameter would give compilation error if you write so. –  Nawaz Jul 29 '11 at 6:08
1  
@Nawaz: Good point: either way, b relies on the caller-provided reference, and the caller is responsible for ensuring the lifetime of the referenced object is longer than b's potential use. b(10) is the extreme case where b's useless. But, not being able to create a b from a const object is a major show stopper that doesn't fit with the implied utility of B. –  Tony D Jul 29 '11 at 7:01
1  
Actually you can even use a cast operator. operator int () const { return a + 1; } and then you get exactly what OP wanted... Except cast operators are kind of nasty... –  rioki Jul 29 '11 at 8:24

Are you OK using C++0x ? if yes,

int main()
{
    int a = 10;
    auto b = [&a]() -> int { return a + 1; };
    cout << b() << endl;
}

Since, it is not tagged with c++0x, you can use nested classes instead of nested functions. This column from Herb sutter would help you for existing c++. http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/058.htm

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You need to capture a by reference. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 29 '11 at 6:31
1  
@Marinho, we are not modifying the variable a. Why should we capture it by reference ? –  Jagannath Jul 29 '11 at 6:42
2  
Because if you don't you won't see the changes. If you change a to 4, b() won't return 5. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 29 '11 at 7:16
    
@Maritinho, Got you. Thanks. –  Jagannath Jul 30 '11 at 0:18

If you're using C++0x (GCC 4.5+, Visual C++ 2010), you can use lambdas:

int a = 5;
auto b = [&a]{ return a + 1; };

std::cout << b() << std::endl;

Depending on what you're doing, though, there are probably cleaner solutions - possibly some variation of the classic "method that takes in 'a' and returns 'b'"

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1  
You need to capture a by reference. I fixed that :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 29 '11 at 6:30
    
Whoops, thank you for catching that. :) –  Chris W. Jul 29 '11 at 12:26

I want to have a variable that depends on the value of another variable, like b in this example:

I see you just need a reference variable:

int a;
int &b =a;
a=10;
cout << b; // 10

Why C++0x lambdas do come for this, I dont understand.

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In the example in the question, b has a value that depends on a, but not the same value as a. You can't get that behaviour from a reference. –  Mike Seymour Jul 29 '11 at 7:20
    
You are correct - it's one way dependency! –  Ajay Jul 29 '11 at 7:56

A simple approach is to use pre-processor macros, nothing C++ specific about it though:

#define b ((a)+1)

int main(){
    int a;
    a=3;
    cout << b;
    a=4;
    cout << b;
}

#undef b
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Define a class called LinkedInt or something that behaves like an int, but has a RelatedTo relationship on itself and an additional member that is a function pointer to the function to evaluate when computing the integer's value. Pretty straightforward. Let me know if you need some pointers on the coding.

The short answer is that OOP is more than enough to bury this problem.

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This is possible if you use lambda functions (c++0x), because they can capture local variables.

Example:

int main()
{
  int a;
  auto f = [&] () -> int { return a + 1; };
  a = 3;
  std::cout << f() << std::endl;
  a = 4;
  std::cout << f() << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Result:

4
5

(See http://ideone.com/MlzX7 for proof)

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The above doesn't work because C++ doesn't allow nested functions.

You can simulate that using nested structure. In C++0x you can make use of lambda function, which provides the same means of function inside function.

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You could define a class that had a member a, and then a function b() that returned the value of a+1. A basic implementation would be something like:

class Dependent {
public:
    Dependent(void) { m_value = 0; }
    void set(int value) { m_value = value; }
    int b(void) { return(m_value + 1); }
private:
    int m_value;
};


int main(){
    Dependent a;
    a.set(3);
    cout << a.b();
    a.set(4);
    cout << a.b();
}

You could add operator overloading as appropriate to make it work more like normal integers if you so desired.

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1  
The class would need to have a pointer or a reference to the variable a in order to get the desired behavior. –  Emile Cormier Jul 29 '11 at 5:32

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