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Usually not calling Dispose indicates a possible error or sloppy code and may lead to some hard to find bugs. Ideally I would like to spot if Disposed was not called during unit tests.

One of the methods we used was to put Debug.Assert in the Finalizer

#if DEBUG
~MyClass()
{
    Debug.Assert(false, “MyClass.Dispose() was not called”);
}
#endif

And we found ourselves clicking through assert message boxes but it didn’t work well with continuous integration builds that would ignore the popups.

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btw. you can use Debug.Fail(...) instead of Debug.Assert(false, ...) – tanascius Mar 26 '09 at 18:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you log this somehow instead of using a Debug.Assert, and used dependency injection to specify your logger implementation, then you could use mock testing to catch this. So, your class may take a logger instance in its constructor, or provide a default one, and then behave like this:

public MyClass : IDisposable
{

IEventLogger _eventLogger;

public MyClass() : this(EventLogger.CreateDefaultInstance())
{
}

public MyClass(IEventLogger eventLogger)
{
    _eventLogger = eventLogger;
}

// IDisposable stuff...

#if DEBUG
~MyClass()
{
    _eventLogger.LogError("MyClass.Dispose() was not called");
}
#endif

}
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It is possible to write an fxCop rule to detect this issue.

Also, making sure that all uses of IDisposable are used inside a using{} block makes this much easier to deal with.

the rule I had checked for either manual calls to Dispose() or use of using{}

Manual calls to dispose are of course more difficult to detect in all situations, since there might be flow control or exceptions that may prevent the call from occurring.

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You can use a Mock object framework (like RhinoMocks) to make sure IDisposable.Dispose() is called. If Dispose() were not called the framework will automatically fail the build.

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