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I really want to use hashsets in my program. Using a dictionary feels ugly. I'll probably start using VS2008 with .Net 3.5 some day, so my ideal would be that even though I can't (or can I?) use hashsets in VS2005, when I start using .NET 3.5, I don't want to have to change much, if anything, in order to switch to using these hashsets.

I am wondering if anyone is aware of an existing hashset implementation designed with this in mind, or a way to use the 3.5 hashset in VS2005.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can use HashSet<T> in a 2.0 application now - just reference System.Core.dll and you should be good to go.

Note: This would require you to install the .NET 3.5 framework which is free and separate from Visual Studio. Once you have that installed you will have the new System.Core assembly which contains the HashSet<T> type. Since the .NET frameworks versions 2.0 - 3.5 all share the same CLR you can use this assembly in your 2.0 application without any issues.

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It does require you to be on XP or higher, however. That's the problem I ran into, and why I had to create my own HashSet<T>. We develop on XP, and get all the great VS 2008 stuff, but all of our clients are on Win2K, and can't run the .NET 3.5 framework, so we have to target .NET 2.0. –  Chris Doggett Apr 2 '09 at 19:57
    
Can't I just extract HashSet from System.Core and compile it into my assembly? –  Anton Tykhyy Sep 12 '09 at 8:05
3  
Yes, you could but that doesn't mean you should. The framework's license prohibits this very thing. –  Andrew Hare Sep 12 '09 at 20:50
    
I have tried using it but it does not work. –  Tasawer Khan Jun 29 '10 at 5:23
    
I've tried using it and it does work. Though in order to distribute such an app you'd need to either make sure the user has .Net Framework 3.5 or would need to include the System.Core DLL with the application (by default, system.core is not output to the release directory). –  Brian Nov 24 '10 at 22:16
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Here's one I wrote for 2.0 that uses a Dictionary<T, object> internally. It's not an exact match of the 3.5 HashSet<T>, but it does the job for me.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;

public class HashSet<T> : ICollection<T>, ISerializable, IDeserializationCallback
{
    private readonly Dictionary<T, object> dict;

    public HashSet()
    {
        dict = new Dictionary<T, object>();
    }

    public HashSet(IEnumerable<T> items) : this()
    {
        if (items == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        foreach (T item in items)
        {
            Add(item);
        }
    }

    public HashSet<T> NullSet { get { return new HashSet<T>(); } }

    #region ICollection<T> Members

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if (null == item)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("item");
        }

        dict[item] = null;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes all items from the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <exception cref="T:System.NotSupportedException">The <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> is read-only. </exception>
    public void Clear()
    {
        dict.Clear();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return dict.ContainsKey(item);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Copies the items of the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> to an <see cref="T:System.Array"/>, starting at a particular <see cref="T:System.Array"/> index.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="array">The one-dimensional <see cref="T:System.Array"/> that is the destination of the items copied from <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>. The <see cref="T:System.Array"/> must have zero-based indexing.</param><param name="arrayIndex">The zero-based index in <paramref name="array"/> at which copying begins.</param><exception cref="T:System.ArgumentNullException"><paramref name="array"/> is null.</exception><exception cref="T:System.ArgumentOutOfRangeException"><paramref name="arrayIndex"/> is less than 0.</exception><exception cref="T:System.ArgumentException"><paramref name="array"/> is multidimensional.-or-<paramref name="arrayIndex"/> is equal to or greater than the length of <paramref name="array"/>.-or-The number of items in the source <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> is greater than the available space from <paramref name="arrayIndex"/> to the end of the destination <paramref name="array"/>.-or-Type T cannot be cast automatically to the type of the destination <paramref name="array"/>.</exception>
    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        if (array == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
        if (arrayIndex < 0 || arrayIndex >= array.Length || arrayIndex >= Count)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("arrayIndex");
        }

        dict.Keys.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes the first occurrence of a specific object from the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if <paramref name="item"/> was successfully removed from the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>; otherwise, false. This method also returns false if <paramref name="item"/> is not found in the original <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="item">The object to remove from the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.</param><exception cref="T:System.NotSupportedException">The <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> is read-only.</exception>
    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        return dict.Remove(item);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of items contained in the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// The number of items contained in the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/>.
    /// </returns>
    public int Count
    {
        get { return dict.Count; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a value indicating whether the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> is read-only.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1"/> is read-only; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    #endregion

    public HashSet<T> Union(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> unionSet = new HashSet<T>(this);

        if (null == set)
        {
            return unionSet;
        }

        foreach (T item in set)
        {
            if (unionSet.Contains(item))
            {
                continue;
            }

            unionSet.Add(item);
        }

        return unionSet;
    }

    public HashSet<T> Subtract(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> subtractSet = new HashSet<T>(this);

        if (null == set)
        {
            return subtractSet;
        }

        foreach (T item in set)
        {
            if (!subtractSet.Contains(item))
            {
                continue;
            }

            subtractSet.dict.Remove(item);
        }

        return subtractSet;
    }

    public bool IsSubsetOf(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> setToCompare = set ?? NullSet;

        foreach (T item in this)
        {
            if (!setToCompare.Contains(item))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    public HashSet<T> Intersection(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> intersectionSet = NullSet;

        if (null == set)
        {
            return intersectionSet;
        }

        foreach (T item in this)
        {
            if (!set.Contains(item))
            {
                continue;
            }

            intersectionSet.Add(item);
        }

        foreach (T item in set)
        {
            if (!Contains(item) || intersectionSet.Contains(item))
            {
                continue;
            }

            intersectionSet.Add(item);
        }

        return intersectionSet;
    }

    public bool IsProperSubsetOf(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> setToCompare = set ?? NullSet;

        // A is a proper subset of a if the b is a subset of a and a != b
        return (IsSubsetOf(setToCompare) && !setToCompare.IsSubsetOf(this));
    }

    public bool IsSupersetOf(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> setToCompare = set ?? NullSet;

        foreach (T item in setToCompare)
        {
            if (!Contains(item))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    public bool IsProperSupersetOf(HashSet<T> set)
    {
        HashSet<T> setToCompare = set ?? NullSet;

        // B is a proper superset of a if b is a superset of a and a != b
        return (IsSupersetOf(setToCompare) && !setToCompare.IsSupersetOf(this));
    }

    public List<T> ToList()
    {
        return new List<T>(this);
    }

    #region Implementation of ISerializable

    /// <summary>
    /// Populates a <see cref="T:System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo"/> with the data needed to serialize the target object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="info">The <see cref="T:System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo"/> to populate with data. </param><param name="context">The destination (see <see cref="T:System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext"/>) for this serialization. </param><exception cref="T:System.Security.SecurityException">The caller does not have the required permission. </exception>
    public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        if (info == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("info");
        dict.GetObjectData(info, context);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Implementation of IDeserializationCallback

    /// <summary>
    /// Runs when the entire object graph has been deserialized.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">The object that initiated the callback. The functionality for this parameter is not currently implemented. </param>
    public void OnDeserialization(object sender)
    {
        dict.OnDeserialization(sender);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Implementation of IEnumerable

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns an enumerator that iterates through the collection.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// A <see cref="T:System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator`1"/> that can be used to iterate through the collection.
    /// </returns>
    /// <filterpriority>1</filterpriority>
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return dict.Keys.GetEnumerator();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns an enumerator that iterates through a collection.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// An <see cref="T:System.Collections.IEnumerator"/> object that can be used to iterate through the collection.
    /// </returns>
    /// <filterpriority>2</filterpriority>
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}
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Ok, strike me down if necessary, but you really defeated the point of a HashSet here. You replaced the functionality of the HashSet.Contains() method with the Dictionary.ConatinsKey() method. This method is O(n) while the HashSet.Contains() method is O(1). this implementation has all the speed of a List<T> object. –  SamuelWarren Apr 16 '10 at 18:56
    
@highphilosopher: This was just a quick and dirty approximation of a HashSet<T>. What I'd actually do, and what I am doing now, since I have to support users on Win2K while making use of HashSet<T>s and other 3.5 goodies, is to recompile Mono's System.Core for 2.0 and develop in VS 2008. The above code served my purposes for the few weeks I was using it, and isn't meant to be used for anything but small data sets. –  Chris Doggett Apr 16 '10 at 21:03
12  
@highphilosopher: That's incorrect. For the record, Dictionary<> key methods (including ConstainsKey) are hashed O(1) implementations and very similar to HashSet methods of a similar purpose. ContainsValue is O(n). One of the purposes of Dictionary is to provide high speed lookup for keys, rather than using an index as an array. –  Kevin Brock Apr 20 '10 at 17:53
2  
Kevin, thank you for striking me down :) I am off an that one. –  SamuelWarren Apr 20 '10 at 18:56
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You could use Iesi.Collections (used by NHibernate) or Mono's HashSet

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+! for link for Mono's HashSet, that was exactly what I was looking for comming here from Google –  PiotrK Jul 11 at 23:09
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The C5 Library also has a HashSet implementation.

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I think PowerCollections library should fit your needs. It's an open source library that contains several collection classes that were missing in .NET, including Set<T>, Bag<T>, MultiDictionary etc. It runs on .NET 2.0. I've been using it for couple of years now and I'm very pleased with it.

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You can alias the Dictionary as Hashset with a using directive. Not really the same thing, but it might simplify things for you later.

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